ironworks


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i·ron·works

 (ī′ərn-wûrks′)
pl.n.
(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A building or establishment where iron is smelted or where heavy iron products are made.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ironworks

(ˈaɪənˌwɜːks)
n
(Commerce) (sometimes functioning as singular) a building in which iron is smelted, cast, or wrought
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i•ron•works

(ˈaɪ ərnˌwɜrks)

n., pl. -works. (used with a sing. or pl. v.)
a place where iron is smelted or where it is cast or wrought.
[1575–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ironworks - the workplace where iron is smelted or where iron goods are madeironworks - the workplace where iron is smelted or where iron goods are made
workplace, work - a place where work is done; "he arrived at work early today"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ironworks

[ˈaɪənwɜːks] N (sing and pl) → fundición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ironworks

[ˈaɪərənwɜːrks] nferronnerie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ironworks

[ˈaɪənˌwɜːks] nsgstabilimento siderurgico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"And who bought the ironworks of Manson and of Shuman and of Van Deher and of Atwood, which have all been given up of late?"
Lofty pillars formed of cannon, superposed upon huge mortars as a base, supported the fine ironwork of the arches, a perfect piece of cast-iron lacework.
The doors had been torn from their hinges and removed; the linings had been stripped off, only a shred hanging here and there by a rusty nail; the lamps were gone, the poles had long since vanished, the ironwork was rusty, the paint was worn away; the wind whistled through the chinks in the bare woodwork; and the rain, which had collected on the roofs, fell, drop by drop, into the insides with a hollow and melancholy sound.
The mail coach doors were on their hinges, the lining was replaced, the ironwork was as good as new, the paint was restored, the lamps were alight; cushions and greatcoats were on every coach-box, porters were thrusting parcels into every boot, guards were stowing away letter-bags, hostlers were dashing pails of water against the renovated wheels; numbers of men were pushing about, fixing poles into every coach; passengers arrived, portmanteaus were handed up, horses were put to; in short, it was perfectly clear that every mail there, was to be off directly.
and the chased ironwork, which drove Biscornette to despair?
"Besides, even if he had tried to do it, he would have brought all that ironwork down to the ground.
Then I came to a flight of steps, and then to a blind door, secured by a latch of elaborate Eastern ironwork, which I could only trace by touch, but which I loosened at last.
Once the chords began to buckle, there were thousands of tons of ironwork, all riveted together and lying in midair without support.
Ar rayed--I MUST say arrayed--arrayed artlessly in dazzling white paint as to wood and dark green as to ironwork the simple-minded distribution of these colours evoked the images of simple-minded peace, of arcadian felicity; and the childish comedy of disease and sorrow struck me sometimes as an abom inably real blot upon that ideal state.
The merchant in London, vesting this hundred pounds in English goods, such as the captain had written for, sent them directly to him at Lisbon, and he brought them all safe to me to the Brazils; among which, without my direction (for I was too young in my business to think of them), he had taken care to have all sorts of tools, ironwork, and utensils necessary for my plantation, and which were of great use to me.
My cargo, as near as I can recollect, for I have not kept account of the particulars, consisted of a sufficient quantity of linen, and some English thin stuffs, for clothing the Spaniards that I expected to find there; and enough of them, as by my calculation might comfortably supply them for seven years; if I remember right, the materials I carried for clothing them, with gloves, hats, shoes, stockings, and all such things as they could want for wearing, amounted to about two hundred pounds, including some beds, bedding, and household stuff, particularly kitchen utensils, with pots, kettles, pewter, brass, &c.; and near a hundred pounds more in ironwork, nails, tools of every kind, staples, hooks, hinges, and every necessary thing I could think of.
He was musing deeply by the mixed ironwork and ashes of his vanished motor-bicycle, a melancholy figure.