irrational

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ir·ra·tion·al

 (ĭ-răsh′ə-nəl)
adj.
1.
a. Not endowed with reason.
b. Affected by loss of usual or normal mental clarity; incoherent, as from shock.
c. Marked by a lack of accord with reason or sound judgment: an irrational dislike.
2.
a. Being a syllable in Greek and Latin prosody whose length does not fit the metric pattern.
b. Being a metric foot containing such a syllable.
3. Mathematics Of or relating to an irrational number.
n. Mathematics
An irrational number.

ir·ra′tion·al·ly adv.
ir·ra′tion·al·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

irrational

(ɪˈræʃənəl)
adj
1. inconsistent with reason or logic; illogical; absurd
2. incapable of reasoning
3. (Mathematics) maths
a. not rational
b. (as noun): an irrational.
4. (Poetry) prosody (in Greek or Latin verse)
a. of or relating to a metrical irregularity, usually the occurrence of a long syllable instead of a short one
b. denoting a metrical foot where such an irregularity occurs
irˈrationally adv
irˈrationalness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ir•ra•tion•al

(ɪˈræʃ ə nl)

adj.
1. lacking the faculty of reason; deprived of reason.
2. lacking sound judgment or logic: irrational arguments.
3. not controlled or governed by reason: irrational behavior.
4.
a. (of a number) not capable of being expressed exactly as a ratio of two integers.
b. (of a function) not capable of being expressed exactly as a ratio of two polynomials.
c. (of an equation) having an unknown under a radical sign or, alternately, with a fractional exponent.
5. of or pertaining to a syllable in Greek or Latin prosody whose quantity does not fit the meter.
n.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin]
ir•ra′tion•al•ly, adv.
ir•ra′tion•al•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.irrational - a real number that cannot be expressed as a rational number
real, real number - any rational or irrational number
transcendental number - an irrational number that is not algebraic
algebraic number - root of an algebraic equation with rational coefficients
Adj.1.irrational - not consistent with or using reason; "irrational fears"; "irrational animals"
incoherent - without logical or meaningful connection; "a turgid incoherent presentation"
illogical, unlogical - lacking in correct logical relation
unreasonable - not reasonable; not showing good judgment
rational - consistent with or based on or using reason; "rational behavior"; "a process of rational inference"; "rational thought"
2.irrational - real but not expressible as the quotient of two integers; "irrational numbers"
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
rational - capable of being expressed as a quotient of integers; "rational numbers"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

irrational

adjective
2. senseless, wild, crazy, unstable, insane, mindless, demented, aberrant, brainless They behaved in such a bizarre and irrational manner.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

irrational

adjective
Not governed by or predicated on reason:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
iracionální
epälooginenirrationaalinen

irrational

[ɪˈræʃənl] ADJ [behaviour, person, belief] → irracional
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

irrational

[ɪˈræʃənəl] adj
[feeling, behaviour, idea, belief] → irrationnel(le)
an irrational fear of science → une peur irrationnelle de la science
[argument] → irrationnel(le)
to be irrational → être irrationnel
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

irrational

adj
(= illogical, also Math, Psych) → irrational; fear, beliefunsinnig, irrational; (= not sensible)unvernünftig; he had become quite irrational about iter hatte eine irrationale Einstellung dazu entwickelt; if you maintain X, then it is irrational to deny Ywenn Sie X behaupten, ist es widersinnig or unlogisch, Y zu leugnen
(= not having reason) animalvernunftlos
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

irrational

[ɪˈræʃənl] adjirrazionale
an irrational fear → una paura irrazionale
he had become quite irrational about it → era diventato piuttosto irragionevole al riguardo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ir·ra·tion·al

n. irracional.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, living in a politically heated environment, amidst poor economic conditions, ends up irrationalizing many of our deeds.
Such models actually distort Islamic fundamentalist ideas by irrationalizing them.
Key here is that the person of the Spirit is real in its relationally complex concretion, and active precisely in that concretion: "the Spirit is a force field that constitutes public force fields," structures into which people are drawn and from which issue the gifts of the Spirit, "forbid[ding] every form of essentially individualizing, privatizing, and irrationalizing faith" (242).