irreformability

irreformability

(ˌɪrɪˌfɔːməˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
the state or condition of being irreformable
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Courts make effective and binding interpretations of the law, which the state effectively enforces, without claims of infallibility and irreformability. Further, these laws are periodically revisited and amended in light of extended reflection or changing circumstances, in many instances for the good.
(57) This seems an extrapolated interpretation probably motivated by knowledge of later disputes over irreformability initiated by the Franciscans and Guido's active involvement in the preparation of papal bulls.
(59.) This is not to deny that Guido might have later developed his view along hard infallibility lines, especially in the context of later 1320s disputes over irreformability initiated by the Franciscans.
Inspiration results in "inerrancy," which the Catechism of the Catholic Church describes as "the attribute of the books of Scripture whereby they faithfully and without error teach that truth which God, for the sake of our salvation, wished to have confided through the Sacred Scripture." (12) Accordingly, "inerrancy" (the result of inspiration) seems to parallel "irreformability," the result of an exercise of infallibility--a topic I consider later.
Simultaneously, one can acknowledge a theological parallelism between "irreformability" and "inerrancy": the former claims that a specific doctrine genuinely represents the teaching of Christ; the latter claims that Scripture teaches salvific truth without error.
Despite the fact that the encyclical's judgments carried great weight at the time, it is significant that Rosmini in practice opposed the contention regarding the irreformability of the Church by hastily composing between November 18, 1832, and March 11, 1833, the Five Wounds, presenting a thorough examination of what he regarded as the most important dysfunctions afflicting the institutional Catholic Church of his time.
The papalists also believed that since the pope was infallible when he pronounced definitive judgments on matters of faith and morals, the irreformability of his teaching did not depend on the consensus of the bishops.
But surely, every Catholic theologian should know that the ex sese clause of Pastor aeternus excludes consensus to a papal definition only if it is made a condition on which the irreformability of the definition would depend.
Grisez would then appear to accept, in part, Sullivan's extension of canon 749[section]3 to nondefined dogma, at least for the faithful, since, in the case of artificial contraception, the irreformability of this teaching would not have been clearly established for them.
The first Vatican Council's solemn assertion that the pope's infallible definitions of the faith do not derive their "irreformability" from the consensus of the Church continues to stimulate research into the historical controversy which the council intended to settle.
irreformability is the distinctive quality of infallible teaching, whether this is in the form of a solemn definition or in the form of the teaching of the ordinary universal magisterium that a doctrine is "definitively to be held." Doctrine that has been infallibly proposed cannot be reversed.
As I understand the matter, irreformability is the distinctive quality of infallible teaching, whether this is in the form of a solemn definition or in the form of the teaching of the ordinary universal magisterium that a doctrine is "definitively to be held." Doctrine that has been infallibly proposed cannot be reversed.