irremissible

ir·re·mis·si·ble

 (ĭr′ĭ-mĭs′ə-bəl)
adj.
Not remissible; unpardonable: irremissible sins.

ir′re·mis′si·bil′i·ty n.
ir′re·mis′si·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

irremissible

(ˌɪrɪˈmɪsəbəl)
adj
1. unpardonable; inexcusable
2. that must be done, as through duty or obligation
ˌirreˌmissiˈbility, ˌirreˈmissibleness n
ˌirreˈmissibly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
'Unbridled' means 'out of control'--an irremissible urge peculiar only to Africans.
He said the 'sit-in group' has committed an irremissible crime by creating hurdles in the progress of public and further added that these people who were indulged in levelling 'baseless' allegations, 'their real faces have been exposed before the people and Imran has now become 'Lord of Liars''.
Al-Basheer would change his unpredictable and irremissible attitudes towards the internationals, it might interest you to read the story of this Sudanese Woman.
The two dominant groups of benign fibroosseous lesions, ossifying fibromas and fibrous dysplasia, have a similar pattern of disease progression so it becomes irremissible to distinguish between the two [7].
Unis donc par l'origine juive, la provenance roumaine et par une indeniable participation fondatrice aux mouvements europeens d'avantgarde durant la Premiere Guerre Mondiale et dans l'entre-deux-guerres, Tristan Tzara, Benjamin Fondane, Ilarie Voronca et Claude Sernet seront reunis en France durant la Deuxieme Guerre Mondiale, le second evenement historique irremissible qui allait profondement marquer leurs biographies.
Mais le voyage est aussi << dereliction irremissible >>, separation et perte.
(6) Especially in his prose writing, Dante makes use of a textual patrimony, at once new and ancient, in order to set into motion an unhinging of equations that, in a culture marked by Aristotelianism, seemed to be irremissible. Mental knowledge is the pivot on which verbum and vox are put forth in a unique dialectical relationship.
The burden of irremissible existence must be constantly reassumed.
(20) For Levinas and Blanchot, the 'there is' is a horrifying state of 'irremissible being' from which the subject cannot escape, but it also provides the foundation for an ethical conception of subjectivity, especially in Levinas' later works, where this conception of the subject's enchainment to the word takes the form of a responsibility and proximity to the radically Other.