isoform


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

i·so·form

 (ī′sō-fôrm′)
n.
Any of the chemically distinct forms of a protein that perform the same biochemical function, although often at different rates.

isoform

(ˈaɪsəʊˌfɔːm)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of several forms of the same protein, derived either from the same gene or from different genes, each of which is similar in function to the others
References in periodicals archive ?
The RIU for each isoform was calculated by taking the ratio between each band's RIU with its own RIU actin band.
Transferrin and its glycan isoform in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)
The study builds on earlier work by this Osaka University-centered group, which showed that exposing these stem cells to an isoform of laminin, a structural component of the matrix that fills the space outside of cells, led to the creation of cell colonies arranged as four concentric zones.
Double nested PCR was carried out by Applied Biosystems 2720 Thermal Cycler in every patient to determine the isoform of PML RAR[alpha] fusion gene.
"If men lack a specific isoform of this gene, we may be able to personalise their therapy", he explained.
Against a background of a general increase in the quantity of Treg and Th17 polarization in IBD, the absence of FOXP3[DELTA]2 accumulation indicates that the accompanying inflammation is not associated with this isoform. Thus, the opportunity of FOXP3[DELTA]2 to accumulate in the nucleus is more significant when suppressing the immune response than the inability to restrict IL-17 expression.
Luo et al., "Alternative isoform regulation in human tissue transcriptomes," Nature, vol.
Recently, we have established that the Hcs of marine mollusk Rapana thomasiana (RtH) and [beta]-Hc isoform of H.pomatia ([beta]-HpH) are suitable as potential bioadjuvants for subunit vaccines and that these Hcs could be used as natural adjuvants or protein carriers [8, 9].
cPKC[beta]II is the most studied isoform for diabetic complications.
Hong et al., "Characterizing antiviral mechanism of interleukin-32 and a circulating soluble isoform in viral infection," Cytokine, vol.
An inverse correlation exists between the size of the apo(a) isoform and the Lp(a) plasma concentration, such that large apo(a) isoforms are associated with low Lp(a) plasma concentrations and vice versa, with up to a 1000-fold difference in Lp(a) concentration noted between individuals.