isokinetic


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isokinetic

(ˌaɪsəʊkɪˈnɛtɪk)
adj
(Weightlifting) weightlifting relating to a type of limb movement in which the muscle contracts and shortens at a constant speed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Job simulation advocates contend it approximates actual work activity, and that isolating the muscle groups to be evaluated (isokinetic) fails to permit the body to work (and be tested) as a complete musculoskeletal unit.
'Isokinetic strength and arm bone mass in postmenopausal tennis players' analysed the condition of older players, while 'The performance preconditions of Czech world junior tennis champions' took care of the youngsters.
* OUTCOMES MEASURED Presupplementation and postsupplementation change in maximal weight lifted, cycle ergometry sprint peak power, and isokinetic dynamometer peak torque were measured.
A newly redesigned Reuter sampler allows separate entry and exit airflow; which may improve performance hut also provides an actual flow rate and can more closely approximate isokinetic conditions.
One of them is Advatech, based at Sandycroft, Flintshire, which recently obtained a loan of pounds 100,000 to help it design and develop an isokinetic machine which will be used by hospitals, sports injury clinics and others to test the integrity of physiotherapy programmes.
The study will observe 160 women between the ages of 18 and 26 and observe the effects of 30 weeks of isokinetic resistance exercise on their non-dominant arms and legs by using the Biodex[R] exercise machine.
Accumulate and scale functions support a set of manual and automatic calibration options and isokinetic testing.
He now spends six hours a day exercising at the Isokinetic rehab centre at Casteldebole, near Bologna.
Both cross-sectional [1-7] and longitudinal [8, 9] studies have consistently documented an age-related decline in muscle function, affecting static (isometric) as well as dynamic (isokinetic), and proximal as well as distal muscle strength.
Team lifting strength has been studied for both isometric and isokinetic lifting in teams of two and three men (Karwowski & Mital, 1986) and in teams of two and three women (Karwowski & Pongpatanasuegsa, 1988).
In the early 1980's isokinetic machines were used to identify persons who were "at risk" for back injuries or had spinal issues not yet presented.
There are several studies showing that isokinetic muscle strengthening exercises improve proprioception, balance and physical function.[8-14]