isolationism

(redirected from Isolationists)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Isolationists: isolationism

i·so·la·tion·ism

 (ī′sə-lā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries.

i′so·la′tion·ist n. & adj.

isolationism

(ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a policy of nonparticipation in or withdrawal from international affairs
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an attitude favouring such a policy
ˌisoˈlationist n, adj

i•so•la•tion•ism

(ˌaɪ səˈleɪ ʃəˌnɪz əm, ˌɪs ə-)

n.
the policy or doctrine that peace and economic advancement can best be achieved by isolating one's country from alliances and commitments with other countries.
[1920–25, Amer.]
i`so•la′tion•ist, n., adj.

isolationism

the policy or doctrine directed toward the isolation of a country from the affairs of other nations by a deliberate abstention from political, military, and economic agreements. — isolationist, n.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isolationism - a policy of nonparticipation in international economic and political relations
foreign policy - a policy governing international relations
Translations
izolacionizam
izolacionizmus

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈleɪʃənɪzəm] Naislacionismo m

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃənɪzəm] nisolationnisme m

isolationism

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃˌnɪzm] nisolazionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Seventy years later, it's easy to forget how divided America was in the prewar period, a time when isolationists had no difficulty packing large auditoriums with vocal supporters and filling streets with antiwar protesters.
Friday's strikes won't satisfy the American isolationists who think the U.S.
For Britain, the isolationists won the debate with Brexit and now want a "UK is full up" sign put up for the world to see.
NNA - Information Minister Melhem Riachi said via Twitter on Sunday that, "Some March 8 members have deemed that today's conflict is between the advocates of stability and isolationists who want civil war...This is a true description with one difference, namely that those considered to be 'isolated' are the ones open to the Arab and international worlds, and adhering to stability and legitimacy." In a second Tweet, Riachi added, "While the advocates of stability, in their words, are actually the ones who are exposing Lebanon to the dangers of sanctions and siege, and activists outside the legitimacy." R.Sh.
"Isolationists must not prevail in this new debate over foreign policy," warns Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations.
And when we all observe what horrors are created by tribalism, one might have hoped that British nationalists, in all their silly shapes, from fascists to Eurosceptics, from tartan armies to English hooligans, from separationists to little Englanders, from isolationists to xenophobes, from Tory Colonel Blimps to angry Ukip supporters, could come to see that the basic fault lies in them, that they cannot grasp a higher vision than their own prejudice.
Isolationists in Iran and Republicans in Washington would love to see the deal fail, for very different reasons, giving the two leaders political challenges they will need to work on for many months after the diplomats finish their work.
The Sphinx: Franklin Roosevelt, the Isolationists, and the Road to World War II
All nationalists are isolationists, confining and limiting their thinking mostly to one country, so that, sooner or later, some nationalists of
involvement in World War II give us the Official Version: an all-too-familiar narrative pitting evil pro-Hitler "isolationists" against the heroic far-seeing pro-British WASPs and a bevy of British spooks demanding immediate intervention.
Olson, who has previously written about the British experience in the early years of the war in Europe, has produced a dramatic account of the battle waged between American isolationists and interventionists during the same period.
Thomas Mann, a veteran congressional expert at the Brookings Institution, told AFP that while the Republican Party has largely accommodated the "economic libertarianism" of the Tea Party faithful in Congress, "true isolationists have little support among Republicans in office.