isometric


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

i·so·met·ric

 (ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
adj. also i′so·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl)
1. Of or exhibiting equality in dimensions or measurements.
2. Of or being a crystal system of three equal axes lying at right angles to each other.
3. Physiology Of or involving muscular contraction against resistance in which the length of the muscle remains the same.
n.
A line connecting isometric points.

[From Greek īsometros, of equal measure : īso-, iso- + metron, measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

i′so·met′ri·cal·ly adv.

isometric

(ˌaɪsəʊˈmɛtrɪk)
adj
1. having equal dimensions or measurements
2. (Physiology) physiol of or relating to muscular contraction that does not produce shortening of the muscle
3. (General Physics) (of a crystal or system of crystallization) having three mutually perpendicular equal axes
4. (Chemistry) crystallog another word for cubic4
5. (Poetry) prosody having or made up of regular feet
6. (General Engineering) (of a method of projecting a drawing in three dimensions) having the three axes equally inclined and all lines drawn to scale
n
7. (General Engineering) Also called: isometric drawing a drawing made in this way
8. (General Physics) Also called: isometric line a line on a graph showing variations of pressure with temperature at constant volume
[C19: from Greek isometria (see iso- + -metry) + -ic]
ˌisoˈmetrically adv

i•so•met•ric

(ˌaɪ səˈmɛ trɪk)

adj. Also, i`so•met′ri•cal.
1. of, pertaining to, or having equality of measure.
2. of or pertaining to isometric exercise.
3. noting or pertaining to a system of crystallization that is characterized by three equal axes at right angles to one another.
4. designating a method of projection (isomet′ric projec′tion) in which a three-dimensional object is represented by a drawing (i′somet′ric draw′ing) having the horizontal edges of the object drawn usu. at a 30° angle and all verticals projected perpendicularly from a horizontal base.
n.
6. an isometric drawing.
[1830–40; iso- + -metric]
i`so•met′ri•cal•ly, adv.

i·so·met·ric

(ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
See cubic.

isometric

- From Latin isus, "equal," and -metria, "measuring."
See also related terms for measuring.

isometric

Describes contraction that increases the internal tension in a muscle without shortening it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isometric - a line connecting isometric pointsisometric - a line connecting isometric points  
line - a mark that is long relative to its width; "He drew a line on the chart"
contour, contour line - a line drawn on a map connecting points of equal height
Adj.1.isometric - related by an isometry
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
2.isometric - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension increases while length remains constant
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
isotonic - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension is constant while length changes
3.isometric - having equal dimensions or measurements
equal - having the same quantity, value, or measure as another; "on equal terms"; "all men are equal before the law"
4.isometric - of a crystal system characterized by three equal axes at right angles
crystallography - the branch of science that studies the formation and structure of crystals
cubic, three-dimensional - having three dimensions
Translations
izometrikus

isometric

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmetrɪk] ADJisométrico
isometric exercisesejercicios mpl isométricos

isometric

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmɛtrɪk] adj (Math, Geog, Poetry) → isometrico/a

iso·met·ric

a. isométrico-a, de dimensiones iguales.

isometric

adj isométrico
References in classic literature ?
In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing--among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas's, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice, where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.
Moreover, it allows performing both isometric and isokinetic testing and despite the fact that no action in real life occurs at constant velocity, isokinetic testing provides a more natural movement condition due to its dynamic nature, whereby a maximal torque can be generated throughout the whole ROM.6 However, its elevated cost limits its widespread use in clinical practice.7 Hand-held dynamometers (HHDs) are usually used for strength assessment.
The isometric hip bridge, side plank, inset above, and, below, the lunge are all part of the equation when building strength
Thirty-two men (n=16; age: 21.1 [+ or -] 1.8 yrs; resistance training age: 4.1 [+ or -] 2.5 yrs) and women (n = 16; age: 22.0 [+ or -] 1.7 yrs; resistance training age: 2.4 [+ or -] 2.4 yrs) were successfully matched ([less than or equal to] 10% difference) for maximal force produced during an isometric squat when normalized to bodyweight as seen in Figure 1.
A repeated measures within-subjects design was adopted on a sample of martial arts athletes to study the effects on isometric strength (i.e.
There was an increase in the systolic, diastolic, and the MBPs on the application of cardiovascular sympathetic stressor in both the groups while performing the isometric exercise as well as CPT.
Among the varieties of dynamometry, isometric lumbar extension dynamometry (ILED) is considered a satisfactory instrument for occupational evaluation and monitoring especially of populations of workers whose activities demand high levels of strength (13).
Eligible patients were randomly divided into three groups as isokinetic (n=15), aerobic (n=15), and isometric exercise groups (n=15).
The firm started out in 1990 as Isometric Tool & Design Inc., building molds for producers of medical and drug-delivery components.
The amount of isometric peak force an athlete can generate has been historically connected to maximum muscle strength capabilities and dynamic performance.
A static, or isometric, exertion is one during which no movement occurs at the joint, while a dynamic exertion results in lengthening (eccentric exertion) or shortening (concentric exertion) of the muscle (Tortora & Derrickson, 2009).