isomorphism


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Related to isomorphism: Graph isomorphism

i·so·mor·phism

 (ī′sə-môr′fĭz′əm)
n.
1. Biology Similarity in form, as in organisms of different ancestry.
2. Mathematics A one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.
3. A close similarity in the crystalline structure of two or more substances of similar chemical composition.

i′so·mor′phous adj.

isomorphism

(ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
1. (Biology) biology similarity of form, as in different generations of the same life cycle
2. (Chemistry) chem the existence of two or more substances of different composition in a similar crystalline form
3. (Mathematics) maths a one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two or more sets, such as those of Arabic and Roman numerals, and between the sums or products of the elements of one of these sets and those of the equivalent elements of the other set or sets

i•so•mor•phism

(ˌaɪ səˈmɔr fɪz əm)

n.
1. the state or property of being isomorphous or isomorphic.
2. Math. a one-to-one relation onto the map between two sets, which preserves the relations existing between elements in its domain.
[1820–30; isomorph (ous) + -ism]

isomorphism

close similarity between the forms of different crystals. See also biology. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Physics
similarity in the form or structure of organisms that belong to a different species or genus. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Biology

isomorphism

The existence of two or more different substances which have the same crystal structure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isomorphism - (biology) similarity or identity of form or shape or structure
similarity - the quality of being similar
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations
izomorfismus
Isomorphismus
izomorfizam
izomorfizmus

isomorphism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzm] nisomorfismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Equipped with this isomorphism, then, they construct the basic interchange isomorphism between the horizontal fusion of two vertical fusions, and the vertical fusion of two horizontal fusions of sectors.
Explicitly, the isomorphism (0.1) is given by associating to f ([tau]) [member of] [M.sub.3m]([GAMMA]) the m-canonical form [f ([tau])(d[tau] [LAMBDA] dz).sup.[cross product]m] where z is the uniformizing coordinate on the smooth fibres C/(Z T Z[tau]) of [pi].
In contrast to this widespread use, our understanding of the theoretical foundation (namely the graph isomorphism problem) is incomplete and current algorithmic symmetry tools are inadequate for big data applications.
Brunninge describes this as "the inherent tensions in the interplay of self-understanding (on the organizational level) and forces pushing toward isomorphism (field level)" (p.
Isomorphism of finite groups is central to the study of point symmetries and geometric symmetries of any object in the nature.
Accordingly, we extend the study of legitimacy with a neo-institutional (or institutional sociology) perspective that emphasises the need for isomorphism with established and prevalent practices or norms within the firms' institutional environments (Doh et al.
The literature highlights two countervailing isomorphic pressures on a firm's international operations: internal isomorphism and external isomorphism (Davis et al., 2000; Francis et al., 2009; Puck et al., 2009; Yiu and Makino, 2002).
Finally, we take the isomorphism [U.sub.3]: [L.sub.2] ([R.sup.2]) [right arrow] [L.sub.2]([R.sup.2]) defined by
In addition, we propose [lambda]-VF2 algorithm to match the subgraph isomorphism.
An isomorphism of ordered trees is an isomorphism of rooted trees that moreover preserves these orderings.
Isomorphism has been noticed since Max Weber's bureaucratic structure was applied and diffused into all kinds of institutions.
Dimaggio and Powell (1983) identify three mechanisms for institutional isomorphic change: coercive isomorphism, normative isomorphism and mimetic isomorphism.