isomorphism

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i·so·mor·phism

 (ī′sə-môr′fĭz′əm)
n.
1. Biology Similarity in form, as in organisms of different ancestry.
2. Mathematics A one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.
3. A close similarity in the crystalline structure of two or more substances of similar chemical composition.

i′so·mor′phous adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

isomorphism

(ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
1. (Biology) biology similarity of form, as in different generations of the same life cycle
2. (Chemistry) chem the existence of two or more substances of different composition in a similar crystalline form
3. (Mathematics) maths a one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two or more sets, such as those of Arabic and Roman numerals, and between the sums or products of the elements of one of these sets and those of the equivalent elements of the other set or sets
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i•so•mor•phism

(ˌaɪ səˈmɔr fɪz əm)

n.
1. the state or property of being isomorphous or isomorphic.
2. Math. a one-to-one relation onto the map between two sets, which preserves the relations existing between elements in its domain.
[1820–30; isomorph (ous) + -ism]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

isomorphism

close similarity between the forms of different crystals. See also biology. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Physics
similarity in the form or structure of organisms that belong to a different species or genus. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

isomorphism

The existence of two or more different substances which have the same crystal structure.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isomorphism - (biology) similarity or identity of form or shape or structure
similarity - the quality of being similar
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
izomorfismus
Isomorphismus
izomorfizam
izomorfizmus

isomorphism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzm] nisomorfismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
We have two fundamental [SL.sub.2](Z)-equivariant isomorphisms:
Maps can be seen as from polyhedra in origin to graphs in development through abstraction, he says, which is why algebraic graphs are much concerned with the present stage, He covers abstract graphs, abstract maps, duality, orientability, orientable maps, non-orientable maps, isomorphisms of maps, assymetrization, asymmetrized petal bundles, asymmetrized maps, maps within symmetry, genus polynomials, census with partitions, equations with partitions, upper maps of a graph, genera of a graph, isogemial graphs, and surface embeddability.
Thus, D and I need not be isometric isomorphisms between H and [L.sup.2.sub.[alpha],[beta]] [0, T] in Lemma 16.
By Stallings' Theorem [11] (see also [5]), they also induce isomorphisms on the lower central series quotients of fundamental groups:
Furthermore different morphisms such as weak isomorphisms, co-weak isomorphism and isomorphisms are defined.
Isomorphisms in the category of sup-algebras and their homomorphisms are precisely surjective homomorphisms that are order-embeddings.
These authors observed that formal organizations, proposed by Meyer and Rowan (1977), are already established in modern society, and proposed that they continue to become more homogeneous as result of interaction processes, named isomorphisms, which occur in organizational fields and provide a context such that individual efforts to rationally deal with uncertainty and constraint lead to homogeneity in structure, culture and output.
Lectures on Duflo isomorphisms in Lie algebra and complex geometry.
Shea points out that Millikan's theory of content relies heavily on the existence of isomorphisms between a system of representations and the things in the world which they represent.
Moreover, this paper is to derive some straightforward consequences of the relations between quotient SU-algebras and isomorphisms and also investigate some of its properties.
The values [x.sub.0], ..., [x.sub.4]) are invariant under isomorphisms, so edges that are equivalent under the automorphism group have the same values.