isotope

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i·so·tope

 (ī′sə-tōp′)
n.
One of two or more atoms having the same atomic number but different mass numbers.

[iso- + Greek topos, place (so called because the isotopes of a chemical element occupy the same position in the periodic table of elements).]

i′so·top′ic (-tŏp′ĭk) adj.
i′so·top′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

isotope

(ˈaɪsəˌtəʊp)
n
(Chemistry) one of two or more atoms with the same atomic number that contain different numbers of neutrons
[C20: from iso- + Greek topos place]
isotopic adj
ˌisoˈtopically adv
isotopy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

i•so•tope

(ˈaɪ səˌtoʊp)

n.
one of two or more forms of a chemical element having the same number of protons, or the same atomic number, but having different numbers of neutrons, or different atomic weights.
[1913; iso- + Greek tópos place]
i′so•top′ic (-ˈtɒp ɪk) adj.
i`so•top′i•cal•ly, adv.
i•sot•o•py (aɪˈsɒt ə pi, ˈaɪ səˌtoʊ pi) n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·tope

(ī′sə-tōp′)
One of two or more atoms that have the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. Carbon 12, the most common form of carbon, has six protons and six neutrons, whereas carbon 13 has six protons and seven neutrons.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isotope - one of two or more atoms with the same atomic number but with different numbers of neutrons
atom - (physics and chemistry) the smallest component of an element having the chemical properties of the element
radioisotope - a radioactive isotope of an element; produced either naturally or artificially
deuterium, heavy hydrogen - an isotope of hydrogen which has one neutron (as opposed to zero neutrons in hydrogen)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
izotóp
samsæta
izotopas
isotop

isotope

[ˈaɪsəʊtəʊp] Nisótopo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

isotope

[ˈaɪsətəʊp] nisotope m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

isotope

nIsotop nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

isotope

[ˈaɪsəˌtəup] nisotopo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

i·so·tope

n. isótopo, elemento químico parte de un grupo de elementos que presentan propiedades casi idénticas, pero difiere de éstos en el peso atómico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

isotope

n isótopo
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, 12CO2 is about 2 % lighter than 13CO2, so 12CO2 molecules diffuse and react slightly faster, and thus the microbes themselves become "isotopically light," containing more 12C than 13C, and when they die and leave their remains in the fossil record, their stable isotopic signature remains, and is measurable.
The data comparison showed that ancient and modern pandas are isotopically distinct from one another, suggesting differences in their dietary habits.
In turn, each of these--from Maxam and Gilbert chemical sequencing, to isotopically labeled Sanger sequencing in slab gels, to fluorescently labeled Sanger sequencing in capillary electrophoresis instruments, to massively parallel short read sequencing by synthesis approaches read out via pyrosequencing, ionic pulses, or fluorescent methods--has appeared, gone through rounds of optimization, and yielded more information more easily, faster, and cheaper per base pair than prior methods.
2011) and the uptake of isotopically labelled molecules in the field (Hill et al.
Peaks corresponding to isotopically labeled internal standards are denoted by an asterisk.
If that person migrates to an isotopically different region, the mismatch in tissue and local water isotope ratios will identify that person as non-local.
The goals of this analysis were threefold: first, to organize the commingled remains in order to establish an minimum number of individuals (MNI) and biological profile for each individual; second, to isotopically examine place of birth and recent migration history; and third, to establish maternal ancestry as assessed through mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups.
It should be noted that Orbitrap instrumentation is very capable of providing isotopically resolved data for proteins up to 50 kDa.
Isotopic analysis is only useful when diet groups are distinct (Ben-David and Flaherty 2012); thus, we first determined which prey could be distinguished isotopically from one another.
Such isotopically modified GNW is thus advantageous over isotopically pure GNWs, which show [[kappa].sub.L] only 69% lower than that of straight GNRs.
Comparing the isotopic composition of the fossil stalagmites deposited during the early to middle Holocene with the modern stalagmites in Oman has revealed that the fossil stalagmites are much more isotopically depleted [31].