italic


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I·tal·ic

 (ĭ-tăl′ĭk, ī-tăl′-)
adj.
1. Of or relating to ancient Italy or its peoples or cultures.
2. Of or relating to the branch of the Indo-European language family that includes Latin, Faliscan, Oscan, Umbrian, and the Romance languages.
3. italic Of or being a style of printing type patterned on a Renaissance script with the letters slanting to the right: This sentence is printed in italic type.
n.
1. The Italic branch of Indo-European.
2. often italics Italic print or typeface.

[Latin Italicus, from Italia, Italy.]

italic

(ɪˈtælɪk)
adj
Also: Italian of, relating to, or denoting a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the right
n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a style of printing type modelled on this, chiefly used to indicate emphasis, a foreign word, etc. Compare roman1
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (often plural) italic type or print
[C16 (after an edition of Virgil (1501) printed in Venice and dedicated to Italy): from Latin Italicus of Italy, from Greek Italikos]

Italic

(ɪˈtælɪk)
n
(Languages) a branch of the Indo-European family of languages that includes many of the ancient languages of Italy, such as Venetic and the Osco-Umbrian group, Latin, which displaced them, and the Romance languages
adj
(Languages) denoting, relating to, or belonging to this group of languages, esp the extinct ones

i•tal•ic

(ɪˈtæl ɪk, aɪˈtæl-)

adj.
1. designating or pertaining to a style of printing types in which the letters usu. slope to the right, used for emphasis, to separate different kinds of information, etc.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to ancient Italy and its peoples prior to the expansion of Rome in the 3rd to 1st centuries b.c.
n.
3. Often, italics. italic type.
4. (cap.) a family of languages, a branch of the Indo-European family, that was spoken in ancient Italy and includes Latin, Osco-Umbrian, and, in most classifications, Venetic.
[1555–65; < Latin Italicus < Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.italic - a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the rightitalic - a style of handwriting with the letters slanting to the right
cursive, cursive script, longhand, running hand - rapid handwriting in which letters are set down in full and are cursively connected within words without lifting the writing implement from the paper
2.Italic - a branch of the Indo-European languages of which Latin is the chief representative
Indo-European language, Indo-Hittite, Indo-European - the family of languages that by 1000 BC were spoken throughout Europe and in parts of southwestern and southern Asia
Osco-Umbrian - a group of dead languages of ancient Italy; they were displace by Latin
Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
3.italic - a typeface with letters slanting upward to the right
font, fount, typeface, face, case - a specific size and style of type within a type family
Adj.1.italic - characterized by slanting characters; "italic characters"
2.Italic - of or relating to the Italic languages; "ancient Italic dialects"
Translations
حَرْف مائِل
psaný kurzivou
kursiv
dõlt betû
skáletraîur
kursyvaskursyvinisparašyti kursyvu
kursīvs
kursiv
eğik yazıitalik

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk] ADJ (Typ) → en cursiva or bastardilla

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk]
adjitalique italics
nplitalique m
printed in italics → imprimé en italique

italic

adjkursiv; italic typeKursivdruck m; italic scriptKurrentschrift f
n italics
plKursivschrift f, → Kursive f; in italicskursiv (gedruckt)

italic

[ɪˈtælɪk] adj (handwriting) → corsivo/a

italic

(iˈtӕlik) , (aiˈtalik) adjective
(of print) of the sloping kind used eg to show emphasis and for the examples in this dictionary. This example is printed in italic type.
iˈtalicize, iˈtalicise (-saiz) verb
to put (words) in italics.
iˈtalics noun plural
italic print. This example is printed in italics.
References in classic literature ?
Bon-Bon was Ionic - Bon-Bon was equally Italic. He reasoned à priori - He reasoned also à posteriori.
I then commenced and continued copying the Italics in Webster's Spelling Book, until I could make them all without looking on the book.
The words in italics were mutilated by the telegraph in transmission from Australia, and reaching the company in the form mentioned above gave rise to the mistake.
"EXCEPT Gilbert -- AND Charlie Sloane," said Diana, imitating Anne's italics and slyness.
She forgot to send any message of kindness to Lady O'Dowd, as her wont was--and did not mention Glorvina by name, and only in italics, as the Major's BRIDE, for whom she begged blessings.
THE FORMER SEEMS TO BE MUCH THE MORE IMPORTANT (The italics are mine.), for nearly similar variations sometimes arise under, as far as we can judge, dissimilar conditions; and on the other hand, dissimilar variations arise under conditions which appear to be nearly uniform." Nietzsche, recognising this same truth, would ascribe practically all the importance to the "highest functionaries in the organism, in which the life-will appears as an active and formative principle," and except in certain cases (where passive organisms alone are concerned) would not give such a prominent place to the influence of environment.
After mentioning the duality of subject and object, which is supposed to constitute consciousness, he proceeds in italics: "EXPERIENCE, I BELIEVE, HAS NO SUCH INNER DUPLICITY; AND THE SEPARATION OF IT INTO CONSCIOUSNESS AND CONTENT COMES, NOT BY WAY OF SUBTRACTION, BUT BY WAY OF ADDITION"(p.
The italics in these extracts, as in the foregoing, are my own.
If you want to emphasis a particular word or phrase in your message, a good way is to make it italic or bold.
Corrected Information (Shown in Italic) for Section II A-3 (Page 48)
The Bold Italic will select a handful of the best performers to receive a free ticket, on-stage performance, feedback by our judges including Peaches Christ and Honey Mahogany, and compete for win a great prize package.