iteroparous


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

iteroparous

(ˈɪtərəʊˌpærəs)
adj
1. (Botany) Also: polycarpic (of a plant) producing flowers and fruit more than once (usually many times) before dying
2. (Animals) (of an animal) producing offspring more than once during its lifetime
ˈiteroˌparity n
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, the iteroparous genotype must divide its physiological resources between reproduction, somatic growth, and maintenance; hence, this genotype has some probability of surviving to reproduce again (Young 1981).
Reproduction: Indian python is sexually iteroparous and oviparous.
This species is considered an iteroparous species, cataloged until now as having gonochoric species (Erisman et al., 2008); it forms reproductive aggregations from March to June, depending on location (Aburto-Oropeza et al., 2008).
Since the 1970s, most kelts have been released to the estuary after they spawn in a hatchery, and the iteroparous share of the run has declined to <1%.
Amblypygids are long-lived (perhaps 7-10 years), iteroparous, and produce 10-90 eggs per clutch (Fig.
Adaptive adjustment of offspring sex ratio and maternal reproductive effort in an iteroparous mammal.
Such species may possess an iteroparous life history which means that individuals in several age classes of the population are fertile, or they may possess a semelparous life history which is characterized by the property that only individuals of the last age class are fertile.
Longevity, however, may strongly affect individual fitness especially in iteroparous, long-lived species due to positive correlations with reproductive output (Newton 1989, Stearns 1989, Zera & Harshman 2001).
Indeed, if [f.sub.i] > 0 for all i [less than or equal to] n, we say that the species has an iteroparous life history and matrix A is classified as a nonnegative and primitive matrix.
Alternatively, reproductive females of iteroparous amphibians may skip current opposition and invest more effort into future reproduction when the quality of aquatic habitats is unsuitable for offspring surPval (i.e., facultative breeding; Church et al., 2007).