jacks


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jack

 (jăk)
n.
1. often Jack Informal A man; a fellow.
2.
a. One who does odd or heavy jobs; a laborer.
b. One who works in a specified manual trade. Often used in combination: a lumberjack; a steeplejack.
c. Jack A sailor; a tar.
3. Abbr. J Games A playing card showing the figure of a servant or soldier and ranking below a queen. Also called knave.
4. Games
a. jacks(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A game played with a set of small, six-pointed, traditionally metal pieces and a small ball, the object being to pick up the pieces in various combinations.
b. One of the six-pointed pieces so used.
5. Sports A pin used in some games of bowling.
6.
a. A usually portable device for raising heavy objects by means of force applied with a lever, screw, or hydraulic press.
b. A wooden wedge for cleaving rock.
7. A device used for turning a spit.
8. Nautical
a. A support or brace, especially the iron crosstree on a topgallant masthead.
b. A small flag flown at the bow of a ship, usually to indicate nationality.
9. The male of certain animals, especially the ass.
10. Any of various food and game fishes of the family Carangidae, found in tropical and temperate seas.
11. A jackrabbit.
12. A socket that accepts a plug at one end and attaches to electric circuitry at the other.
13. Slang Money.
14. Applejack.
15. Slang A small or worthless amount: You don't know jack about that.
v. jacked, jack·ing, jacks
v.tr.
1. To hunt or fish for with a jacklight: hunters illegally jacking deer.
2.
a. To move or hoist by using a jack. Often used with up: jacked the rear of the car to replace the tire.
b. To raise (something) to a higher level, as in cost. Often used with up: "Foreign producers jacked up the price on some steels by over 100%" (Forbes).
3. Baseball To hit (a pitched ball) hard, especially for a home run.
4. Slang
a. To steal: Someone jacked my bike.
b. To rob or cheat: The dealer jacked me on the price.
v.intr.
1. To hunt or fish by using a jacklight.
2. To plug into an electronic device by means of a jack.
Phrasal Verbs:
jack around
1. To spend time idly.
2. To toy, tinker, or mess: He's been jacking around with that motor for days.
3. To take unfair advantage of, deceive, or manipulate.
jack off Vulgar Slang
1. To masturbate. Usually used of a man.
2. To bring (someone) to orgasm.
jack up
To excite emotionally.

[From the name Jack, from Middle English Jakke, possibly from Old French Jacques, from Late Latin Iacōbus; see Jacob. N., sense 15, short for jack shit. V. tr., senses 4a and b, short for hijack.]

jack′er n.

jacks

(dʒæks)
n
(Games, other than specified) (functioning as singular) a game in which bone, metal, or plastic pieces (jackstones) are thrown and then picked up in various groups between bounces or throws of a small ball. Sometimes called: knucklebones
[C19: shortened from jackstones, variant of checkstones pebbles]

Jacks

A children’s game played with a small ball and several jacks (see Jack, number 1).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jacks - a game in which jackstones are thrown and picked up in various groups between bounces of a small rubber balljacks - a game in which jackstones are thrown and picked up in various groups between bounces of a small rubber ball
child's game - a game enjoyed by children
References in classic literature ?
It was obvious that that young lady did not altogether appreciate the honor done to her by a visit from so distinguished a person as Inspector Jacks!
"My dear young lady," Inspector Jacks said, "I will not ask for your sympathy, for I am afraid I should ask in vain; but we are just now, we people at Scotland Yard, up against one of the most extraordinary problems which have ever been put before us.
Daylight showed four queens and an ace; MacDonald four jacks and an ace; and Kearns four kings and a trey.
And it was at this moment that Jack Kearns suggested poker.
'Now I am right, and now I'll take my corner, Jack. Any dinner, Jack?'
"It's Jack Pumpkinhead's private graveyard," replied the Tin Woodman.
A day's journey from the Emerald City brought the little band of adventurers to the home of Jack Pumpkinhead, which was a house formed from the shell of an immense pumpkin.
After considering the matter carefully, Tip decided that the best place to locate Jack would be at the bend in the road, a little way from the house.
Moore," she said, "that you do everything in your power to discourage this tendency in Jack, he--"; but she got no further.
No other company was in the house than the landlord, his wife, and a grizzled male creature, the "Jack" of the little causeway, who was as slimy and smeary as if he had been low-water mark too.
"Jack Dollop, a 'hore's-bird of a fellow we had here as milker at one time, sir, courted a young woman over at Mellstock, and deceived her as he had deceived many afore.
And Michael went to make the acquaintance of Jack, the surviving Airedale, and to do his daily turn with the leopards.