jailable

jailable

(ˈdʒeɪləbəl)
adj
(of a crime, offence, etc) punishable by imprisonment
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "These offences are jailable but I am persuaded they can be dealt with in an alternative way."
I could've highlighted for my inquisitive reporter that with half the state having smoked pot, a huge percentage of residents got away with a jailable crime.
(3) Most adults have--knowingly or unknowingly--committed a jailable offense.
"We previously only had the action for an PS80 fine, but if they persist with ignoring the law then it is a jailable offence."
Bouncing a cheque is a jailable offence in the UAE.
13, 2016) (statement of Michael Shaffer, Prosecutor, Municipality of Anchorage at 5:53:08 PM) (criticizing jailable offense threshold).
Cairo: The Egyptian parliament is examining a draft bill that makes disparaging remarks on the country's historical figures a jailable offence.
Section 17 prohibits any "unauthorised interception" of "electromagnetic emissions from an information system that are carrying data," essentially criminalizing much of the practice of modern radio hams: not to mention transforming scanning for open wifi into a jailable offence.
Geeta Seshamani, co-founder of Wildlife SOS, said, "Capturing snakes and using them for display and entertainment, is banned and a jailable offence under the Wildlife Protection Act of 1972.
"This experience of being pulled over and apprehended for reasons that wouldn't have even been jailable in the first place was such a common experience that it brought people together in a way that was really important," he said.
The risks consist not so much in outright fraud -- big lies that would be jailable offences -- as in more subtle forms of deception.