jailhouse lawyer


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jailhouse lawyer

n. Slang
A prison or jail inmate who is self-taught about the law and offers information to other inmates, especially to assist them in cases in which they are defending themselves.

jail′house law′yer


n.
a prisoner who has become knowledgeable about legal matters and gives legal advice to fellow inmates.
[1965–70]
References in periodicals archive ?
The so-called "Limbs in the Loch" murderer - a butcher more than an intellectual - fancies himself as jailhouse lawyer and is filling his time taking vexatious legal claims to court.
Trying a case requires additional skills, and Walker had managed the pretrial phase with the help of a jailhouse lawyer who had since been transferred to another prison.
<br />Now a respected advocate, Hopwood began his legal career as a jailhouse lawyer while serving more than a decade in federal prison for bank robbery.
(125) The inmates who provide advice are often dubbed "jailhouse lawyers." (126) Definitions for jailhouse lawyers range from inmates that other inmates contact for informal advice to relationships that more resemble an attorney-client relationship--where the jailhouse lawyer assists the inmate-litigant at each step in his case.
She became a jailhouse lawyer during her time in prison and created the first Law Project in a California women's prison.
Over time, he also became a jailhouse lawyer, gaining a rep as something of an elder statesman.
The murders, trial, and subsequent acquittal of a woman who later became a jailhouse lawyer advocating for those unjustly convicted and for the humane treatment of women prisoners makes for a powerful account of corruption, violence and the legal system and is a pick for any true crime collection or law library.
KILLER dentist Colin Howell has appointed himself jailhouse lawyer to other lags, we can reveal.
So, with tons of time on his hands and a well-stocked law library, he became a noted jailhouse lawyer, writing a book called "A Guide to the Plea Circus," while successfully pushing numerous appeals that whittled his sentence down to 26 years.
Jailhouse lawyer: The second lawyer working for Sakineh Mohammadi-Ashtiani, the woman who became known worldwide after she was sentenced to be stoned for adultery, has been jailed for 11 years for his efforts to publicize her case.
Worse, at times the prison censors seemed to be deliberately attempting to prevent inmates from accessing legal information, prohibiting publications such as Prison Legal News and The Jailhouse Lawyer's Handbook, both of which help the incarcerated muddle through our labyrinthine legal system.