janissary

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jan·is·sar·y

 (jăn′ĭ-sĕr′ē) also jan·i·zar·y (-zĕr′ē)
n. pl. jan·is·sar·ies
1. A soldier of the Ottoman Empire in an elite guard organized in the 1300s and abolished in 1826.
2. A member of a group of elite, highly loyal supporters.

[Middle French jehanicere, janissaire, from Old Italian giannizero, from Ottoman Turkish yeñiçeri, new army, Janissary corps : yañı, new (from Old Turkic yaŋı) + çeri, special troops (from Old Turkic çērig, phalanx, order of battle).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

janissary

(ˈdʒænɪsərɪ) or

janizary

n, pl -saries or -zaries
(Military) an infantryman in the Turkish army, originally a member of the sovereign's personal guard, from the 14th to the early 19th century
[C16: from French janissaire, from Italian giannizzero, from Turkish yeniçeri, from yeni new + çeri soldiery]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jan•is•sar•y

(ˈdʒæn əˌsɛr i)

also jan•i•zar•y

(-ˌzɛr i)

n., pl. -sar•ies also -zar•ies.
1. (often cap.) a member of an elite military unit of the Turkish army organized in the 14th century and abolished in 1826.
2. a member of any group of loyal guards, soldiers, or supporters.
[1520–30; < French janissaire < Italian gian(n)izzero < Turkish yeniçeri=yeni new + çeri soldiery, militia]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.janissary - a loyal supporter; "every politician has a following of janissaries"
follower - a person who accepts the leadership of another
2.Janissary - a Turkish soldier
soldier - an enlisted man or woman who serves in an army; "the soldiers stood at attention"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
janitsaari
janjičar
janicsár
janitsjar
References in classic literature ?
We have been taught to tremble at the terrific visages of murdering janizaries, and to blush at the unveiled mysteries of a future seraglio.
For their men of war; it is a dangerous state, where they live and remain in a body, and are used to donatives; whereof we see examples in the janizaries, and pretorian bands of Rome; but trainings of men, and arming them in several places, and under several commanders, and without donatives, are things of defence, and no danger.
These Belootchees are a kind of brawling, good-for-nothing Janizaries.
A Turkish officer with an immense plume of feathers (the Janizaries were supposed to be still in existence, and the tarboosh had not as yet displaced the ancient and majestic head-dress of the true believers) was seen couched on a divan, and making believe to puff at a narghile, in which, however, for the sake of the ladies, only a fragrant pastille was allowed to smoke.
(18) We have been taught to tremble at the terrific visages of murdering janizaries. (COHA, Hamilton, Madison, Jay, 1817, The Federalist on the New Constitution)
bayonet," like "Turkish janizaries enforcing despotic
A lot of Turkish--spahis, janizaries had penetrated and were oppressing the poor Romanians, taking their fortune".
one Janizarye of the least, is sufficient to guard a man against a thousand Mores, or Arabians or Plebean Turkes in respect of his awfull authority ouer them, as also against all other Soldiers or Janizaries in respect of their brotherly agreement, and feare to breake their law by lighting or quarrelling among themselues.