jarful


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jar 1

 (jär)
n.
1. A cylindrical glass or earthenware vessel with a wide mouth and usually no handles.
2. The amount that a jar can hold.
3. Chiefly British A glass of beer.
tr.v. jarred, jar·ring, jars
To put into a jar.

[Middle English jarre, a liquid measure, from Old French (from Provençal jarra) and from Medieval Latin jarra, both from Arabic jarra, earthen jar, from jarra, to draw, pull; see grr in Semitic roots.]

jar′ful′ n.

jar 2

 (jär)
v. jarred, jar·ring, jars
v.intr.
1.
a. To cause shaking or vibrations: The ride over the old road was jarring.
b. To shake or vibrate from an impact or impacts: "The gallery jarred with a quick, heavy tramp" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
2. To be disturbing or irritating; grate: The incessant talking jarred on my nerves.
3. To be out of harmony; clash or conflict: The curtains jar with the rest of the room.
v.tr.
1. To cause to shake or vibrate from impact: The ride on the donkey jarred my bones.
2. To startle or unsettle; shock: The alarm jarred him out of sleep.
n.
A jolt; a shock.

[Perhaps of imitative origin.]

jar′ring·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jarful - the quantity contained in a jar; "he drank a jar of beer"
containerful - the quantity that a container will hold
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References in classic literature ?
An oval Venetian mirror stood above the fireplace, and reflected duskily in its spotted depths the faint yellow and crimson of a jarful of tulips which stood among the letters and pipes and cigarettes upon the mantelpiece.
When something is available in every branch of Spar, a restaurant that wants to charge PS4.90 for a Kilner jarful needs to set off the fireworks.
A koji mayo adds an extra dollop of umami, pepped up by sweet agave slaw and a scattering of quick-pickled cucumbers that I could eat by the jarful.