jargon

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jar·gon

 (jär′gən)
n.
1. The specialized language of a trade, profession, or similar group, especially when viewed as difficult to understand by outsiders: a crime novel that uses a lot of police jargon.
2. Nonsensical or incoherent language: "Your description will be considered as mere jargon by every man of sense" (Alexander Hamilton).
3. A hybrid language or dialect; a pidgin. Not in technical use.
intr.v. jar·goned, jar·gon·ing, jar·gons
To speak in or use jargon.

[Middle English jargoun, from Old French jargon, probably of imitative origin.]

jar′gon·ist, jar′gon·eer′ n.
jar′gon·is′tic adj.
jar′gon·y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jargon

(ˈdʒɑːɡən)
n
1. (Linguistics) specialized language concerned with a particular subject, culture, or profession
2. language characterized by pretentious syntax, vocabulary, or meaning
3. gibberish
4. (Linguistics) another word for pidgin
vb
(intr) to use or speak in jargon
[C14: from Old French, perhaps of imitative origin; see gargle]

jargon

(ˈdʒɑːɡɒn) or

jargoon

n
(Geological Science) mineralogy rare a golden yellow, smoky, or colourless variety of zircon
[C18: from French, from Italian giargone, ultimately from Persian zargūn of the golden colour; see zircon]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jar•gon

(ˈdʒɑr gən, -gɒn)
n.
1. the language, esp. the vocabulary, peculiar to a particular trade, profession, or group: medical jargon.
2. unintelligible talk or writing; gibberish; babble.
3. pidgin.
4. language that is characterized by uncommon or pretentious vocabulary and convoluted syntax and is often vague in meaning.
v.i.
5. to jargonize.
[1300–50; Middle English jargoun < Middle French; Old French jargon, gargun, derivative of an expressive base *garg-; see gargle, gargoyle]
jar′gon•y, jar`gon•is′tic, adj.
syn: See language.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

jargon


Past participle: jargoned
Gerund: jargoning

Imperative
jargon
jargon
Present
I jargon
you jargon
he/she/it jargons
we jargon
you jargon
they jargon
Preterite
I jargoned
you jargoned
he/she/it jargoned
we jargoned
you jargoned
they jargoned
Present Continuous
I am jargoning
you are jargoning
he/she/it is jargoning
we are jargoning
you are jargoning
they are jargoning
Present Perfect
I have jargoned
you have jargoned
he/she/it has jargoned
we have jargoned
you have jargoned
they have jargoned
Past Continuous
I was jargoning
you were jargoning
he/she/it was jargoning
we were jargoning
you were jargoning
they were jargoning
Past Perfect
I had jargoned
you had jargoned
he/she/it had jargoned
we had jargoned
you had jargoned
they had jargoned
Future
I will jargon
you will jargon
he/she/it will jargon
we will jargon
you will jargon
they will jargon
Future Perfect
I will have jargoned
you will have jargoned
he/she/it will have jargoned
we will have jargoned
you will have jargoned
they will have jargoned
Future Continuous
I will be jargoning
you will be jargoning
he/she/it will be jargoning
we will be jargoning
you will be jargoning
they will be jargoning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jargoning
you have been jargoning
he/she/it has been jargoning
we have been jargoning
you have been jargoning
they have been jargoning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jargoning
you will have been jargoning
he/she/it will have been jargoning
we will have been jargoning
you will have been jargoning
they will have been jargoning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jargoning
you had been jargoning
he/she/it had been jargoning
we had been jargoning
you had been jargoning
they had been jargoning
Conditional
I would jargon
you would jargon
he/she/it would jargon
we would jargon
you would jargon
they would jargon
Past Conditional
I would have jargoned
you would have jargoned
he/she/it would have jargoned
we would have jargoned
you would have jargoned
they would have jargoned
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

jargon

A language that is special to a profession, culture, or subject, often technical, and is not easily understood by outsiders; also used to mean any apparently nonsensical language .
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jargon - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
swiz - British slang for a swindle
heist, rip-off - the act of stealing
shakedown - extortion of money (as by blackmail)
power trip - (slang) a self-aggrandizing action undertaken simply for the pleasure of exercising control over other people
nookie, nooky, piece of tail, roll in the hay, screwing, screw - slang for sexual intercourse
hand job - slang for masturbation
dekko - British slang for a look
square-bashing - drill on a barracks square
shakedown - a very thorough search of a person or a place; "a shakedown by the police uncovered the drugs"
caff - informal British term for a cafe
deck - street name for a packet of illegal drugs
gat, rod - a gangster's pistol
Mickey Finn - slang term for knockout drops
nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
dreck, schlock, shlock - merchandise that is shoddy or inferior
cert - an absolute certainty; "it's a dead cert"
legs - staying power; "that old Broadway play really has legs"
soup-strainer, toothbrush - slang for a mustache
bunghole - vulgar slang for anus
bay window, potbelly, tummy, corporation, pot - slang for a paunch
niff, pong - an unpleasant smell
street name - slang for something (especially for an illegal drug); "`smack' is a street name for heroin"
corker - (dated slang) a remarkable or excellent thing or person; "that story was a corker"
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
codswallop, folderol, trumpery, wish-wash, applesauce, tripe, rubbish, trash - nonsensical talk or writing
skin flick - a pornographic movie
dibs - a claim of rights; "I have dibs on that last slice of pizza"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
rhyming slang - slang that replaces words with rhyming words or expressions and then typically omits the rhyming component; "Cockney rhyming slang"
bunfight, bun-fight - (Briticism) a grand formal party on an important occasion
burnup - a high-speed motorcycle race on a public road
nosh-up - a large satisfying meal
hood - (slang) a neighborhood
'hood - (slang) a neighborhood
paleface - (slang) a derogatory term for a white person (supposedly used by North American Indians)
white trash - (slang) an offensive term for White people who are impoverished
whitey - (slang) offensive names for a White man
slant-eye - (slang) a disparaging term for an Asian person (especially for North Vietnamese soldiers in the Vietnam War)
Injun, red man, Redskin - (slang) offensive term for Native Americans
sheeny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Jew
ginzo, greaseball, Guinea - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a person of Italian descent
Jap, Nip - (offensive slang) offensive term for a person of Japanese descent
spic, spik - (ethnic slur) offensive term for persons of Latin American descent
Boche, Jerry, Kraut, Krauthead, Hun - offensive term for a person of German descent
airhead - a flighty scatterbrained simpleton; "she's a total airhead"; "every airhead on a big salary rushed out to buy one"
babe, sister, baby - (slang) sometimes used as a term of address for attractive young women
bad egg - (old-fashioned slang) a bad person
boffin - (British slang) a scientist or technician engaged in military research
good egg - (old-fashioned slang) a good person
guvnor - (British slang) boss
old man - (slang) boss
out-and-outer - someone who is excellent at something
2.jargon - a colorless (or pale yellow or smoky) variety of zircon
zircon, zirconium silicate - a common mineral occurring in small crystals; chief source of zirconium; used as a refractory when opaque and as a gem when transparent
3.jargon - specialized technical terminology characteristic of a particular subject
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
doctorspeak - medical jargon
ecobabble - using the technical language of ecology to make the user seem ecologically aware
Eurobabble - the jargon of European community documents and regulations
gobbledygook - incomprehensible or pompous jargon of specialists
psychobabble - using language loaded with psychological terminology
technobabble - technical jargon from computing and other high-tech subjects
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

jargon

noun parlance, slang, idiom, patter, tongue, usage, dialect, cant, lingo (informal), patois, argot full of the jargon and slang of self-improvement courses
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

jargon

noun
2. A variety of a language that differs from the standard form:
3. Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لُغَه خاصَّه
hantýrkaslangžargon
fagsprogjargon
ammattikielijargonmongerrusslangi
szaknyelvszakzsargontolvajnyelvzsargonblabla
sérmál
žargons
cargonözel dil

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːgən] Njerga f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːrgɒn ˈdʒɑːrgən] njargon m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

jargon

nJargon m (pej), → Fachsprache f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

jargon

[ˈdʒɑːgən] ngergo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

jargon

(ˈdʒaːgən) noun
special words or phrases used within a group, trade or profession etc. legal jargon; medical jargon; Thieves use a special jargon in order to confuse passing hearers.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

jar·gon

n. jerga, jerigonza; parafasia. V.: paraphasia
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012