jatakas


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Related to jatakas: Jataka Tales, Tripitaka, Panchatantra

jatakas

Stories of the Buddha’s past lives before he was born as Gautama.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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But then the Jatakas also mention some amazing tricks the ship pilots of old used when going to faraway ports.
Jory focuses specifically on the Vessantara Jataka, the final of the series of 550 Jatakas and a tale that reflects the view that the perfection of the virtue of giving opens the way to the final attainment of Buddhahood.
The Vessantara jataka is widely known as the most famous of the 547 stories (jatakas) of the previous lives of the Buddha in the Pali Canon.
The 547 Buddhist jatakas, verse parables, each recount a previous life of the Buddha and how he achieved a particular virtue, says Bowie, and the most popular of these is the Vessantara Jataka, about how, in his last incarnation before the historical Gautama, he learned about generosity.
Naomi Appleton's study of the use of the Jatakas has revealed how some contemporary Buddhists accept that hearing the Dhamma, even if there is no understanding, is enough to produce positive results (Jataka 140).
Aesop meets Confucius in The Pandas and Their Chopsticks: And Other Animal Stories, a blend of classic Chinese proverbs, Indian jatakas, and traditional fables.
During the rule of Abbasid Caliphs, the Arab court was frequented by Greek and Hindu merchants and scholars, and several Sanskrit texts, both secular and sacred, were translated into Arabic and then to Latin and French for their easy reception in Western Europe (Nicholson, 1977:361).Among these texts, mention may be made of Arabian Nights, Panchatantra and Buddha Jatakas. But this commercial relation and cultural negotiation suffered seriously following the fall of Constantinople in 1458 A.D., which hampered the cordial commercial transaction and cultural relation between Muslims and Christians.
237): "For, the yogin does not produce the universe out of his own self in the manner that the one who appears to be a potter produces what appears to be a pot out of what appears to be a ball of clay--in stages, by the real transformation, the modification of form, of the (clay that is made into a) small stupa of the king of Sibi, for example." On reading--in the KSTS edition and in all manuscripts--sibikastupakadirupa[degrees], Nemec seems struck by the two initial words, which betray a "Buddhist" appearance: King Sibi of the Buddhist Jatakas and the stupa.
Rather, Gandharan stupas were decorated with an eclectic mix of scenes from the Buddha life and from the jatakas, that served for the edification of believers who were presumed to be familiar with the Master's life story.
We have a rich tradition of stories -- the Jatakas and the Panchatantra -- that use animal imagery very effectively to talk of human situationsC* Are we to exercise such references and block off the rich world of animal symbolism from the purview of schoolchildren?" The monitoring committee has further branded some of the suggestions incomprehensible.
The merit of the translation lies in the fact that Jatakas have been translated first time in Polish which enhances the beauty for the readers.
Anyone who reads the canonical and post-canonical Pali stories of monks in the Jatakas, Dhammapada-Atthakatha, and various suttas or later vernacular stories in Lao, Khmer, Thai, Burmese, or Sinhala (as well as Chinese, Japanese, Tibetan and other North and East Asian Buddhist literatures) can see that monks display a wide range of extreme emotions.