jawbreaker

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jaw·break·er

 (jô′brā′kər)
n.
1. A very hard candy.
2. Slang A word that is difficult to pronounce.
3. A machine that crushes rock or ore.

jaw′break′ing adj.
jaw′break′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jawbreaker

(ˈdʒɔːˌbreɪkə)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) Also called: jawcrusher a device having hinged jaws for crushing rocks and ores
2. informal a word that is hard to pronounce
ˈjawˌbreaking adj
ˈjawˌbreakingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jaw•break•er

(ˈdʒɔˌbreɪ kər)

n.
1. a word that is hard to pronounce.
2. a very hard, usu. round, candy.
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jawbreaker - a large round hard candy
hard candy - candy that is brittle; "you can break a tooth on that hard candy"
2.jawbreaker - a word that is hard to pronounce
polysyllabic word, polysyllable - a word of more than three syllables
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

jawbreaker

[ˈdʒɔːˌbreɪkəʳ] N (US) → trabalenguas m inv, palabra f kilométrica
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Big-field handicaps, especially those below the top level, are frequently jawbreakingly tedious affairs jammed with inconsistent horses possessing negligible charisma, leaving no lasting impression on the observer.
Josh Richman, an Oakland Tribune reporter who worked with the slain journalist and has been heavily involved in the Bailey project, describes the first meetings as "jawbreakingly awful." Rosenthal remembers them as "completely chaotic, a huge mess.