jaws


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jaw

 (jô)
n.
1.
a. Either of two bony or cartilaginous structures that in most vertebrates form the framework of the mouth and hold the teeth.
b. The mandible or maxilla or the part of the face covering these bones.
c. Any of various structures of invertebrates that have an analogous function to vertebrate jaws.
2. Either of two opposed hinged parts in a mechanical device.
3. jaws The walls of a pass, canyon, or cavern.
4. jaws A dangerous situation or confrontation: the jaws of death.
5. Slang
a. Impudent argument or back talk: Don't give me any jaw.
b. A conversation or chat.
intr.v. jawed, jaw·ing, jaws Slang
1. To talk vociferously; jabber.
2. To talk; converse.

[Middle English jawe, jowe, perhaps from Old French joue, cheek.]

jaw′less adj.

jaws

(dʒɔːz)
pl n
1. (Physical Geography) the narrow opening of some confined place such as a gorge
2. the jaws a dangerously close position: the jaws of death.
References in classic literature ?
The bull-dog stood too short, while its massive jaws were an added protection.
Toto did not approve this new comrade at first, for he could not forget how nearly he had been crushed between the Lion's great jaws. But after a time he became more at ease, and presently Toto and the Cowardly Lion had grown to be good friends.
Environed by them, while the Woodman and the Farmer worked unheeded, those two of the large jaws, and those other two of the plain and the fair faces, trod with stir enough, and carried their divine rights with a high hand.
They were narrow between the eyes and broad between the cheeks, while their lower jaws were projecting and massive.
And then about him coiled the great, slimy folds of a hideous monster of that prehistoric deep--a mighty serpent of the sea, with fanged jaws, and darting forked tongue, with bulging eyes, and bony protuberances upon head and snout that formed short, stout horns.
Wolf Larsen stooped, coolly, to the Cockney, and pressed with thumb and finger at the rear of the jaws and below the ears.
These nipped off the tails and paws and feet of the Mice with their jaws, while spears only beat on them.
Some slept and growled in their sleep, some gnawed at the skulls of dead game, some sat up like dogs and their tongues hung from their grinning jaws. I looked, I saw, and beyond I discovered the mouth of the cave, where the bones of the boy should be.
Again the rat charged and as Turan stepped quickly back to avoid the menacing jaws, something seemed to jerk suddenly upon his right ankle, and as he drew his left foot back to regain his equilibrium his heel caught upon a taut chain and he fell heavily backward to the floor just as the rat leaped upon his breast and sought his throat.
We have differences correlated not only to one sex, but to that short period alone when the reproductive system is active, as in the nuptial plumage of many birds, and in the hooked jaws of the male salmon.
"Dreadfully hungry," answered the Tiger, snapping his jaws together with a fierce click.
Each branch ends in a set of strong jaws, which have been known to drag down and devour large and formidable beasts of prey.