jealousy

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jealousy

jealous resentment against a person enjoying success or advantage; anger or fear of losing something or someone to a rival: Her unbridled jealousy is apparent whenever her boyfriend dances with another woman. [Although envy and jealousy are close in meaning, they have some different connotations. To envy is to feel unhappy because someone else possesses or has accomplished something you wish you had yourself. Jealousy is resenting someone who has gained something that you think you more rightly deserve. It also refers to the anguish caused by fear or suspicions of unfaithfulness.]
Not to be confused with:
envy – a feeling of discontent or covetousness of another’s advantages, possessions, or attainments; desire for something possessed by another: I envy her talent for decorating.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

jeal·ous·y

 (jĕl′ə-sē)
n. pl. jeal·ous·ies
1. A jealous attitude or disposition. See Usage Note at jealous.
2. Close vigilance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jealousy

(ˈdʒɛləsɪ)
n, pl -ousies
the state or quality of being jealous. Also called (obsolete): jealoushood
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jeal•ous•y

(ˈdʒɛl ə si)

n., pl. -ous•ies.
1. the quality or state of being jealous.
2. an instance of being jealous; a jealous feeling, disposition, state, or mood: petty jealousies.
syn: See envy.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another
2.jealousy - zealous vigilance; "cherish their official political freedom with fierce jealousy"-Paul Blanshard
alertness, vigilance, watchfulness, wakefulness - the process of paying close and continuous attention; "wakefulness, watchfulness, and bellicosity make a good hunter"; "vigilance is especially susceptible to fatigue"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

jealousy

noun
1. suspicion, distrust, mistrust, possessiveness, doubt, spite, resentment, wariness, ill-will, dubiety At first his jealousy only showed in small ways - he didn't mind me talking to other guys.
Related words
fear zelophobia
Quotations
"O! Beware, my lord, of jealousy;"
"It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock"
"The meat it feeds on" [William Shakespeare Othello]
"Love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave" Bible: Song of Solomon
"It is not love that is blind, but jealousy" [Lawrence Durrell Justine]
"Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies" [Elizabeth Bowen The House in Paris]
"Jealousy is always born with love, but does not always die with it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Jealousy is the greatest of all evils, and the one which arouses the least pity in the person who causes it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Love that is fed by jealousy dies hard" [Ovid Remedia Amoris]
"To jealousy, nothing is more frightful than laughter" [Françoise Sagan La Chamade]
"Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love" [George Eliot The Mill on the Floss]
"the injured lover's hell" [John Milton Paradise Lost]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

jealousy

noun
Resentful or painful desire for another's advantages:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
غَيْرَه
žárlivostzávist
jalousi
ĵaluzo
mustasukkaisuus
féltékenység
afbrÿîisemi; öfund
žiarlivosť
ljubosumjezavist
kıskançlık

jealousy

[ˈdʒeləsɪ] N
1. [of husband, wife, lover] → celos mpl
2. (= envy) [of possessions, qualities] → envidia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsi] njalousie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

jealousy

nEifersucht f (→ of auf +acc); (= envy: of sb’s possessions, success etc) → Neid m, → Missgunst f; their small-minded, petty jealousiesihre engstirnigen, kleinlichen Eifersüchteleien pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsɪ] ngelosia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

jeal·ou·sy

n. celos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
I shall present the public with one or two extracts from it: "An entire and perfect union will be the solid foundation of lasting peace: It will secure your religion, liberty, and property; remove the animosities amongst yourselves, and the jealousies and differences betwixt our two kingdoms.
Notwithstanding their true interest with respect to the continental nations was really the same, yet by the arts and policy and practices of those nations, their mutual jealousies were perpetually kept inflamed, and for a long series of years they were far more inconvenient and troublesome than they were useful and assisting to each other.
Candor will oblige us to admit that even such men may be actuated by upright intentions; and it cannot be doubted that much of the opposition which has made its appearance, or may hereafter make its appearance, will spring from sources, blameless at least, if not respectable -- the honest errors of minds led astray by preconceived jealousies and fears.