jealousy


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jealousy

jealous resentment against a person enjoying success or advantage; anger or fear of losing something or someone to a rival: Her unbridled jealousy is apparent whenever her boyfriend dances with another woman. [Although envy and jealousy are close in meaning, they have some different connotations. To envy is to feel unhappy because someone else possesses or has accomplished something you wish you had yourself. Jealousy is resenting someone who has gained something that you think you more rightly deserve. It also refers to the anguish caused by fear or suspicions of unfaithfulness.]
Not to be confused with:
envy – a feeling of discontent or covetousness of another’s advantages, possessions, or attainments; desire for something possessed by another: I envy her talent for decorating.

jeal·ous·y

 (jĕl′ə-sē)
n. pl. jeal·ous·ies
1. A jealous attitude or disposition. See Usage Note at jealous.
2. Close vigilance.

jealousy

(ˈdʒɛləsɪ)
n, pl -ousies
the state or quality of being jealous. Also called (obsolete): jealoushood

jeal•ous•y

(ˈdʒɛl ə si)

n., pl. -ous•ies.
1. the quality or state of being jealous.
2. an instance of being jealous; a jealous feeling, disposition, state, or mood: petty jealousies.
syn: See envy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)jealousy - a feeling of jealous envy (especially of a rival)
enviousness, envy - a feeling of grudging admiration and desire to have something that is possessed by another
2.jealousy - zealous vigilance; "cherish their official political freedom with fierce jealousy"-Paul Blanshard
alertness, vigilance, watchfulness, wakefulness - the process of paying close and continuous attention; "wakefulness, watchfulness, and bellicosity make a good hunter"; "vigilance is especially susceptible to fatigue"

jealousy

noun
1. suspicion, distrust, mistrust, possessiveness, doubt, spite, resentment, wariness, ill-will, dubiety At first his jealousy only showed in small ways - he didn't mind me talking to other guys.
Related words
fear zelophobia
Quotations
"O! Beware, my lord, of jealousy;"
"It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock"
"The meat it feeds on" [William Shakespeare Othello]
"Love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave" Bible: Song of Solomon
"It is not love that is blind, but jealousy" [Lawrence Durrell Justine]
"Jealousy is no more than feeling alone against smiling enemies" [Elizabeth Bowen The House in Paris]
"Jealousy is always born with love, but does not always die with it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Jealousy is the greatest of all evils, and the one which arouses the least pity in the person who causes it" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]
"Love that is fed by jealousy dies hard" [Ovid Remedia Amoris]
"To jealousy, nothing is more frightful than laughter" [Françoise Sagan La Chamade]
"Anger and jealousy can no more bear to lose sight of their objects than love" [George Eliot The Mill on the Floss]
"the injured lover's hell" [John Milton Paradise Lost]

jealousy

noun
Resentful or painful desire for another's advantages:
Translations
غَيْرَه
žárlivostzávist
jalousi
ĵaluzo
mustasukkaisuus
féltékenység
afbrÿîisemi; öfund
žiarlivosť
ljubosumjezavist
kıskançlık

jealousy

[ˈdʒeləsɪ] N
1. [of husband, wife, lover] → celos mpl
2. (= envy) [of possessions, qualities] → envidia f

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsi] njalousie f

jealousy

nEifersucht f (→ of auf +acc); (= envy: of sb’s possessions, success etc) → Neid m, → Missgunst f; their small-minded, petty jealousiesihre engstirnigen, kleinlichen Eifersüchteleien pl

jealousy

[ˈdʒɛləsɪ] ngelosia

jealous

(ˈdʒeləs) adjective
1. (with of) feeling or showing envy. She is jealous of her sister.
2. having feelings of dislike for any possible rivals (especially in love). a jealous husband.
ˈjealously adverb
ˈjealousy noun

jeal·ou·sy

n. celos.
References in classic literature ?
Instead of their being "joined in affection" and free from all apprehension of different "interests," envy and jealousy would soon extinguish confidence and affection, and the partial interests of each confederacy, instead of the general interests of all America, would be the only objects of their policy and pursuits.
Disdain hath power to kill, and patience dies Slain by suspicion, be it false or true; And deadly is the force of jealousy; Long absence makes of life a dreary void; No hope of happiness can give repose To him that ever fears to be forgot; And death, inevitable, waits in hall.
Jealous is every virtue of the others, and a dreadful thing is jealousy. Even virtues may succumb by jealousy.
Jealousy according to his notions was an insult to one's wife, and one ought to have confidence in one's wife.
I thought it was merely jealousy. You see, I've always been jealous, but I trained myself never to show it; I was jealous of every man she knew; I was jealous of you.
Hence arose another evil, which produced no little uneasiness to the poor pedagogue, of whom she maintained so constant a jealousy, that he durst hardly speak to one woman in the parish; for the least degree of civility, or even correspondence, with any female, was sure to bring his wife upon her back, and his own.
Then he felt a jealousy which be could never have believed possible awakening within him, a jealousy which made him redden with shame and indignation: "One might condone the captain, but this one!" This thought upset him.
An over-scrupulous jealousy of danger to the rights of the people, which is more commonly the fault of the head than of the heart, will be represented as mere pretense and artifice, the stale bait for popularity at the expense of the public good.
Henry Crawford had trifled with her feelings; but she had very long allowed and even sought his attentions, with a jealousy of her sister so reasonable as ought to have been their cure; and now that the conviction of his preference for Maria had been forced on her, she submitted to it without any alarm for Maria's situation, or any endeavour at rational tranquillity for herself.
She provoked the jealousy of the elderly magnate and told him what she had told her other suitor; that is, she put the matter so that the only way for him to obtain a right over her was to marry her.
Jealousy, according to an eminent authority, is the 'hydra of calamities, the sevenfold death'.
The following observations will show that, like most other objections against the Constitution, it can only proceed from a partial view of the subject, or from a jealousy which discolors and disfigures every object which is beheld.