jeopardy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to jeopardy: Wheel of fortune

jeop·ard·y

 (jĕp′ər-dē)
n. pl. jeop·ard·ies
1. Risk of loss or injury; peril or danger.
2. Law A defendant's risk or danger of conviction when put on trial.

[Middle English juperti, from Old French jeu parti, even game, uncertainty : jeu, game (from Latin iocus, joke, game; see yek- in Indo-European roots) + parti, past participle of partir, to divide (from Latin partīre, from pars, part-, part; see part).]

jeopardy

(ˈdʒɛpədɪ)
n (usually preceded by in)
1. danger of injury, loss, death, etc; risk; peril; hazard: his health was in jeopardy.
2. (Law) law danger of being convicted and punished for a criminal offence. See also double jeopardy
[C14: from Old French jeu parti, literally: divided game, hence uncertain issue, from jeu game, from Latin jocus joke, game + partir to divide, from Latin partīrī]

jeop•ard•y

(ˈdʒɛp ər di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. risk of or exposure to loss, harm, death, or injury; hazard; danger: to put one's life in jeopardy.
2. Law. the hazard that a defendant will suffer punishment when found guilty in a criminal proceeding.
[1200–50; j(e)uparti, joupardi(e), j(e)upardi(e) < Old French: literally, divided play, hence, uncertain chance]

jeopardy

- Comes from French ieu parti, "(evenly) divided game" (from Latin jocus partitus, "divided game"), referring originally to chess, in which the chances of winning and losing are balanced.
See also related terms for losing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jeopardy - a source of dangerjeopardy - a source of danger; a possibility of incurring loss or misfortune; "drinking alcohol is a health hazard"
danger - a cause of pain or injury or loss; "he feared the dangers of traveling by air"
health hazard - hazard to the health of those exposed to it
moral hazard - (economics) the lack of any incentive to guard against a risk when you are protected against it (as by insurance); "insurance companies are exposed to a moral hazard if the insured party is not honest"
occupational hazard - any condition of a job that can result in illness or injury
sword of Damocles - a constant and imminent peril; "the possibility hangs over their heads like the sword of Damocles"

jeopardy

noun danger, risk, peril, vulnerability, venture, exposure, liability, hazard, insecurity, pitfall, precariousness, endangerment A series of setbacks have put the whole project in jeopardy.

jeopardy

noun
Exposure to possible harm, loss, or injury:
Translations
nebezpečí
fare
vaara
hætta
briesmasrisks

jeopardy

[ˈdʒepədɪ] Nriesgo m, peligro m
to be in jeopardyestar en peligro
to put sth in jeopardyponer algo en peligro

jeopardy

[ˈdʒɛpərdi] n
to be in jeopardy → être en péril
to put sth in jeopardy → compromettre qch

jeopardy

nGefahr f; in jeopardyin Gefahr, gefährdet; to put somebody/something in jeopardyjdn/etw gefährden or in Gefahr bringen; to be in jeopardy of life and limbin Lebensgefahr schweben or sein

jeopardy

[ˈdʒɛpədɪ] n in jeopardya rischio, in pericolo
to place or put in jeopardy → mettere a repentaglio or in pericolo

jeopardy

(ˈdʒepədi) noun
danger.
ˈjeopardize, ˈjeopardise verb
to put in danger. Bad spelling could jeopardize your chances of passing the exam.
References in classic literature ?
An Assassin is not in jeopardy when tried in California.
No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use without just compensation.
His greatest admirer could not have cordially justified his bringing his harpoon into breakfast with him, and using it there without ceremony; reaching over the table with it, to the imminent jeopardy of many heads, and grappling the beefsteaks towards him.
The great Admiral and good seaman could read aright the signs of sea and sky, as his order to prepare to anchor at the end of the day sufficiently proves; but, all the same, the mere idea of these baffling easterly airs, coming on at any time within half an hour or so, after the firing of the first shot, is enough to take one's breath away, with the image of the rearmost ships of both divisions falling off, unmanageable, broadside on to the westerly swell, and of two British Admirals in desperate jeopardy.
This must undoubtedly be submitted to the national government, and the matter would then be brought to this issue, that the national government, to provide against apprehended danger, might in the first instance raise troops, and might afterwards keep them on foot as long as they supposed the peace or safety of the community was in any degree of jeopardy.
They who promote the idea of substituting a number of distinct confederacies in the room of the plan of the convention, seem clearly to foresee that the rejection of it would put the continuance of the Union in the utmost jeopardy.
Madame," said he, in a grave tone, still partaking something of the timid child, "monsieur le cardinal will tell you that during my minority the affairs of France were in jeopardy, -- and that if I had been older, and obliged to take sword in hand, it would sometimes have been for the evening meal.
Thus, after the death of the King, "the realm stood in great jeopardy a long while, for every lord that was mighty of men made him strong, and many weened to have been King.
Now, I longed to see the inside of a ship more than words can tell; but I was not going to put myself in jeopardy, and I told him my uncle and I had an appointment with a lawyer.
The master gave her none, for one of his speculations was in jeopardy, and his mind was so occupied that he hardly saw the children when he looked at them, and all Roxy had to do was to get them both into a gale of laughter when he came about; then their faces were mainly cavities exposing gums, and he was gone again before the spasm passed and the little creatures resumed a human aspect.
D'Artagnan was secretly touched with remorse, not at inducing Porthos to enter into schemes in which his life and fortune would be in jeopardy, for Porthos, in the title of baron, had his object and reward; but poor Musqueton, whose only wish was to be called Mouston -- was it not cruel to snatch him from the delightful state of peace and plenty in which he was?
Making the blow even harder was that it was a Double Jeopardy round, meaning the deduction was doubled to $3,200.