jeremiad


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jer·e·mi·ad

 (jĕr′ə-mī′əd)
n.
A literary work or speech expressing a bitter lament or a righteous prophecy of doom.

[French jérémiade, after Jérémie, Jeremiah, prophet traditionally considered the author of the biblical book of Lamentations, from Late Latin Ieremiās; see Jeremiah1.]

jeremiad

(ˌdʒɛrɪˈmaɪəd)
n
a long mournful lamentation or complaint

jer•e•mi•ad

(ˌdʒɛr əˈmaɪ əd, -æd)

n.
a prolonged lament; complaint.
[1770–80; Jeremi (ah) + -ad1, in reference to Jeremiah's Lamentations]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jeremiad - a long and mournful complaint; "a jeremiad against any form of government"
complaint - an expression of grievance or resentment

jeremiad

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
Translations
jeremiadivalitusvirsivuodatus
jeremiád
jeremiadeklagesang
jeremiadklagovisa

jeremiad

[ˌdʒerɪˈmaɪəd] Njeremiada f

jeremiad

n (liter)Jeremiade f (liter), → Klagelied nt
References in classic literature ?
Without taking the mate's jeremiads seriously he put them beside the words of Mr.
that Stowe's use of scripture in this jeremiad suggests that she
National Review's Jonah Goldberg concluded an anti-crunchy jeremiad by voicing the suspicion that Dreher might eventually follow the leftward footsteps of ex-righties such as Michael Lind and David Brock.
Chapter 1, "The Commercial Jeremiad," postulates that the end of the eighteenth century witnessed a significant change in the Christian rhetoric used by antislavery writers.
Then conquer we must when our cause is just." It was during New England's conflict with Native Americans, culminating in King Philip's war, that the jeremiad became a popular sermon form.
What leavens the unsympathetic impression Samuel makes is the unexpected laughter that Reza sneaks into the novel's Beckettian jeremiad. Like her plays Life x 3 and Conversations After a Burial, as well as her 1997 first novel Hammerklavier, Desolation exists in the realms of memory and imagination as it honestly registers her ambivalence about family, friendships and mortality.
Maybe, but the vindicating presence of so many friends in the White House seems to have given the Supreme Court's Garbo new confidence: After nearly a decade on the sidelines, in mid-February Thomas emerged into the Washington spotlight at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) with a Castro-length jeremiad on what he views as continuing liberal efforts to stifle him and other conservative culture warriors.
Reflections in Bullough's Pond asks why this should be so, and what it means for the planet." Assuring readers that her book is not a "jeremiad," she emphasizes that it is instead "a paean to the human ability to overcome daunting odds.
That influence includes preaching styles and the complexities of the jeremiad, which Chesebrough recounts, only thinly describing it as "a warning of dire consequences from God if the people fail to follow the precepts of the Almighty" (100).
Whether we read it as a lament for Old England, or a jeremiad against deracination by worldwide market forces, England, England chills with the bleakness of its cultural panorama.
The form and style of Nora's jeremiad reveal, despite the transformation and even annihilation he postulates, a continuity of French education, intellectual style, and eloquence.
That tragedy inspired Bob Ostertag to compose one of Kronos's biggest and angriest hits, "All the Rage," a stunning jeremiad against complacency.