jeremiad

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jer·e·mi·ad

 (jĕr′ə-mī′əd)
n.
A literary work or speech expressing a bitter lament or a righteous prophecy of doom.

[French jérémiade, after Jérémie, Jeremiah, prophet traditionally considered the author of the biblical book of Lamentations, from Late Latin Ieremiās; see Jeremiah1.]

jeremiad

(ˌdʒɛrɪˈmaɪəd)
n
a long mournful lamentation or complaint

jer•e•mi•ad

(ˌdʒɛr əˈmaɪ əd, -æd)

n.
a prolonged lament; complaint.
[1770–80; Jeremi (ah) + -ad1, in reference to Jeremiah's Lamentations]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jeremiad - a long and mournful complaint; "a jeremiad against any form of government"
complaint - an expression of grievance or resentment

jeremiad

noun
A long, violent, or blustering speech, usually of censure or denunciation:
Translations
jeremiadivalitusvirsivuodatus
jeremiád
jeremiadeklagesang
jeremiadklagovisa

jeremiad

[ˌdʒerɪˈmaɪəd] Njeremiada f

jeremiad

n (liter)Jeremiade f (liter), → Klagelied nt
References in classic literature ?
Without taking the mate's jeremiads seriously he put them beside the words of Mr.
Dennis, mad at pews' use, jeremiads at "iron" Essenes' senoritas 'd aim: "Ere Jesus wept, Adam sinned!..." The chief difficulty met with here is that any palindromization of this passage will require a suitable word beginning jere--in order to work, and if one discounts the nickname Jere (which I disfavor on account of its infrequency), there are only a few such words available, none promising; e.g., Jeremiah, jeremiad, jeremian, Jeremy (usable with--nym words such as eponym) and Jerez.
Cutting satire and humorous jeremiads expose the hypocrisies of keeping up with the Joneses in Erlend Loe's novel Doppler.
More broadly, from the founding of the nation ideologues of one stripe or another have disseminated chilling jeremiads proclaiming or predicting the demise of American democracy.
These jeremiads attended the invention of computers, combine harvesters, spinning jennies and probably iron-age axes.
That publication, known for printing Tony Judt's call for a binational Palestinian state and Peter Beinart's jeremiads against the "American Jewish establishment," was, Myers sniffed, "too Israeli."
"When we tie together the jeremiads and rhetoric with what the Trump administration is doing in other governing spaces, the practice of attacking the press becomes clearer as policy than solely reckless rant."
But others beg to differ, citing the testimonies of Edgar Matobato, Arturo Lascanas, and, long before them, the jeremiads of Fr.
Here jeremiads against empire and the corporate state mix with tributes to the many faces of a flourishing regional culture: poets, painters, amateur scientists, irregular old holidays, minor-league baseball squads.
One remembers (nostalgically, alas) Judith Butler's suggestion that the potentially offensive sign on the gay male restaurateur's door, "She's overworked and needs a rest" (167), was an occasion to think about how no constituency owns the feminine (not the female, the feminine); or how the offence taken by the theologian who hated jello-esque religious kitsch became for Eve Sedgwick an analysis of the queerly reparative vestiges of sentimentality (Epistemology 142-43); or, more recently, Lee Edelman's suggestion that we respond to Christians' jeremiad that queers are destroying the world not with "self-righteous bromides of liberal pluralism" (16) but with an analysis of how such jeremiads might, or even should, be true.
As a lawyer, I had never remarked on the Jeremiads' indelible shaping of legal argumentation.
In his foreword to the collection, Sir Martin Gilbert writes: "Each poem in this volume is a world of its own, an assertion of the struggle of the human spirit faced with inexplicable torments." And so it is--the Holocaust lacks merriment, even optimism; the poems are a cycle of Jeremiads each showing that living at the time would have been equal with staying in hell.