jerry can


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jer·ry can

 (jĕr′ē) also jer·ri·can (jĕr′ĭ-kăn′)
n.
A flat-sided can for storing or transporting liquids, especially gasoline, having a capacity of 5 gallons (19 liters).

[From Jerry.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jerry can

n
1. (Units) a flat-sided can with a capacity of between 4.5 and 5 gallons used for storing or transporting liquids, esp motor fuel: originally a German design adopted by the British Army during World War II
[C20: from Jerry]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

jerry can

[ˈdʒɛrɪˌkæn] ntanica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cabinet Minister had sparked the buying frenzy when he declared on Wednesday: "A bit of extra fuel in a jerry can in the garage is a sensible precaution to take."
Fuel tanker drivers are not actually on strike but you would never know it as jittery motorists join the queues outside petrol stations, terrified that they might not get the chance to fill their nice new jerry can to the brim with unleaded.
Fuel tanker drivers are not actually on strike, but you would never know it as jittery motorists join the queues outside petrol stations, terrified that they might not get the chance to fill their nice new jerry can to the brim with unleaded.
Your money can buy: a jerry can, pounds 2.85; sterilising tablets, pounds 3 for enough to purify 200 litres of water; chlorine testing kit, pounds 6.60; plastic sheeting to shelter a family of four, pounds 21, emergency shelter kit to house a family of eight, pounds 60; PVC bladder tank, pounds 1,070.
Vendors have taken advantage of the situation to sell a 30-litre jerry can for least Sh80.
A silly decision to use one of the jerry cans used to purify water as a container for leftover pig meat led to the meat going off and the group binning the jerry can.
Forty-six-year-old Diane Hill suffered 40 per cent burns in her Yorkshire home when decanting a plastic jerry can of petrol into a glass jug in the belief her daughter's car might need a top-up were fuel to be unavailable.
While the name "Jerry Can" is derived from British Army slang referring to Germans as Jerrys (also spelled Gerrys), the original Jerry can was developed in Germany prior to the Second World War in order to satisfy fuel transport requirements for its motorized divisions.
The two said residents cannot continue buying a 20-litre jerry can of water drawn from untreated rivers and springs in the area at Sh50.
Assistant general secretary Diana Holland said: "It's not a jerry can we need but a review of whether the industry is structured in the national interest."
Firefighter Lee Smith confirmed that the container Ms Hill was decanting from was a green jerry can, adding: "It was a normal tea-time activity, cooking a meal, and the person (Ms Hill) was decanting from a petrol container into a glass jug.
Firefighters confirmed the injured woman Ms Hill was decanting fuel from a green jerry can into a glass jug.