Jesuit

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Jes·u·it

 (jĕzh′o͞o-ĭt, jĕz′o͞o-, -yo͞o-)
n.
1. Roman Catholic Church A member of the Society of Jesus.
2. often jesuit One given to subtle casuistry.

[French Jésuite, from Jésus, Jesus, from Late Latin Iēsus; see Jesus1.]

Jes′u·it′i·cal adj.
Jes′u·it′i·cal·ly adv.

Jesuit

(ˈdʒɛzjʊɪt)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) a member of a Roman Catholic religious order (the Society of Jesus) founded by Saint Ignatius Loyola in 1534 with the aims of defending the papacy and Catholicism against the Reformation and to undertake missionary work among the heathen
2. (sometimes not capital) informal offensive a person given to subtle and equivocating arguments; casuist
[C16: from New Latin Jēsuita, from Late Latin Jēsus + -ita -ite1]
ˌJesuˈitic, ˌJesuˈitical adj
Jesuˈitically adv

Jes•u•it

(ˈdʒɛʒ u ɪt, -yu ɪt, ˈdʒɛz-)

n.
1. a member of a Roman Catholic religious order for men (Society of Jesus) founded by Ignatius of Loyola in 1534.
2. (often l.c.) a crafty, intriguing, or equivocating person.
[1550–60; < New Latin Jēsuita= Latin Jēsu(s) + -ita -ite1]
Jes`u•it′i•cal, adj.
Jes`u•it′i•cal•ly, adv.
Jes′u•it•ism, Jes′u•it•ry, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jesuit - a member of the Jesuit orderJesuit - a member of the Jesuit order  
Jesuit order, Society of Jesus - a Roman Catholic order founded by Saint Ignatius of Loyola in 1534 to defend Catholicism against the Reformation and to do missionary work among the heathen; it is strongly committed to education and scholarship
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Adj.1.Jesuit - having qualities characteristic of Jesuits or Jesuitism; "Jesuitical education"
Translations
jezuita
jesuitt

Jesuit

[ˈdʒezjʊɪt]
A. ADJjesuita
B. Njesuita m

Jesuit

[ˈdʒɛzjuɪt] njésuite m

Jesuit

nJesuit m

Jesuit

[ˈdʒɛzjʊɪt] adj & ngesuita (m)
References in classic literature ?
"With the curate of Montdidier and the superior of the Jesuits of Amiens."
Plan of the Salt Lake expedition Great sandy deserts Sufferings from thirst Ogden's River Trails and smoke of lurking savages Thefts at night A trapper's revenge Alarms of a guilty conscience A murderous victory Californian mountains Plains along the Pacific Arrival at Monterey Account of the place and neighborhood Lower California Its extent The Peninsula Soil Climate Production Its settlements by the Jesuits Their sway over the Indians Their expulsion Ruins of a missionary establishment Sublime scenery Upper California Missions Their power and policy Resources of the country Designs of foreign nations
In his account of the mission, where his veracity is most to be suspected, he neither exaggerates overmuch the merits of the Jesuits, if we consider the partial regard paid by the Portuguese to their countrymen, by the Jesuits to their society, and by the Papists to their church, nor aggravates the vices of the Abyssins; but if the reader will not be satisfied with a Popish account of a Popish mission, he may have recourse to the history of the church of Abyssinia, written by Dr.
"Come, come, I've always heard that you ran away with the beautiful Countess Levitsky that time--throwing up everything in order to do it--and not from the Jesuits at all," said Princess Bielokonski, suddenly.
It is a point of cunning, to wait upon him with whom you speak, with your eye; as the Jesuits give it in precept: for there be many wise men, that have secret hearts, and transparent countenances.
Whilst D'Artagnan and Porthos were looking on with critical glances, which disguised an extreme impatience to get forward, a magnificent dais approached preceded by a hundred Jesuits and a hundred Dominicans, and escorted by two archdeacons, a treasurer, a penitent and twelve canons.
This motto was sometimes applied to the Papacy, but not to the Jesuits.
However it was, these insignificant disputes gave rise to two parties in the Gallican Church--the Jansenists and the Jesuits. Great men were found in either camp, and a struggle began between two powerful bodies.
"Isn't there a great and grand one -- the convent of Jesuits?"
A few days later at one of those enchanting fetes which Helene gave at her country house on the Stone Island, the charming Monsieur de Jobert, a man no longer young, with snow white hair and brilliant black eyes, a Jesuit a robe courte* was presented to her, and in the garden by the light of the illuminations and to the sound of music talked to her for a long time of the love of God, of Christ, of the Sacred Heart, and of the consolations the one true Catholic religion affords in this world and the next.
The only well-dressed Portuguese in the camp are the half a dozen well-to-do families, the Jesuit priests, and the soldiers of the little garrison.
He noticed that, whereas the Protestant church was nearly empty and the congregation had a listless air, the Jesuit on the other hand was crowded and the worshippers seemed to pray with all their hearts.