jetliner

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jet·lin·er

 (jĕt′lī′nər)
n.
A large passenger jet airplane.

jetliner

(ˈdʒɛtˌlaɪnə)
n
(Aeronautics) a commercial airliner powered by jet engines

jet•lin•er

(ˈdʒɛtˌlaɪ nər)

n.
a jet airliner for passengers.
[1945–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jetliner - a large jet plane that carries passengersjetliner - a large jet plane that carries passengers
jet, jet plane, jet-propelled plane - an airplane powered by one or more jet engines
Translations

jetliner

[ˈdʒetˌlaɪnəʳ] N (US) → avión m de pasajeros

jetliner

[ˈdʒɛtlaɪnər] n (US)avion m de lignejet plane navion m à réaction
References in periodicals archive ?
The two jetliners were being guided by air controllers in nearby Kansai airport, and the ANK plane allegedly took a slight turn to the right from its flight path to avoid a thundercloud, the bureau said.
The national flag carrier, Thai Airways International (THAI) has purchased two new most advance jetliners, Airbus A330-300 and Boeing 777-300ER.
M2 EQUITYBITES-December 20, 2012-Aircelle completes its first Airbus A320neo Jetliners engine nacelle components(C)2012 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
Airlines are concerned about very light jets, or VLJs, operating in the same airspace as larger commercial jetliners. Flying as high as jetliners, though at slower speeds, they "have the potential for really gumming up the system," John Meenan, executive vice president of U.S.
Emirates, who inked a deal for 150 aircraft, Qatar Airways - 50, and Etihad Airways - 25 jetliners are among the 777X launch customers.
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 2, 2011--Bombardier sells ten jetliners to Swedish Braathens(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
The company, founded in 2003, owns 53 Boeing and Airbus jetliners. Its portfolio is worth $1.2 billion.
M2 EQUITYBITES-June 1, 2011-Braathens Aviation purchases ten CSeries jetliners from Bombardier(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com
The Transportation Security Administration's ban on liquids and gels on jetliners has forced many travelers to start checking their bags.
Northrop Grumman and BAe Systems say they can build missile defense systems for commercial jetliners that will meet standards for durability and operating costs.
NASA, United Airlines and the Department of Homeland Security are developing guidelines for flight crews to operate disabled jetliners using "throttles-only control." The technique requires no modification to the aircraft, so there are no costs involved, noted NASA Dryden PCAR project manager Jennifer Cole.
He said DHS is trying to develop an efficient system for keeping dangerous liquids off of jetliners, but notes that a comprehensive ban may be easier to enforce.