jinn

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jin·ni

or jin·nee also djin·ni  (jĭn′ē, jĭ-nē′)
n. pl. jinn also djinn (jĭn)
In the Koran and Muslim tradition, a spirit often capable of assuming human or animal form and exercising supernatural influence over people.

[Arabic jinnī, demonic, demon, from jinn, demons, from janna, to cover, conceal; see gnn in Semitic roots.]
Usage Note: According to the Koran, humans share this world with another race of mortal beings, the jinn, that God created from pure, smokeless fire and endowed with supernatural powers. In Arabic, the noun jinn designates these beings as a group. An adjective jinnī, "belonging to the jinn," can be made from jinn by the addition of the suffix -ī. Jinnī can then itself be used as a noun with the sense "one belonging to the jinn, a jinni." In this way, the usual word for a single male member of the jinn is jinnī, while a single female is called a jinnīya, using the feminine form of jinnī. (This way of making singulars from nouns denoting groups is common in Arabic—the noun 'arab means "the Arabs, the Arab people," and its derivative 'arabī means "Arabic" and "an Arab.") Following Arabic usage, some writers in English use the English noun jinn only as a plural, to designate the group: These jinn are kindly, while those jinn are malevolent. The English noun jinni then fills the role of a singular for this noun: He met a kindly jinni in the desert. However, other writers in English take jinn as a singular noun designating a single member of the jinn race: He met a kindly jinn in the desert. These writers may then use the uninflected plural jinn, as in These jinn are kindly, and some even use a regularly formed English plural jinns, as in Those jinns are harmful.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jinn

(dʒɪn)
n
(Islam) (often functioning as singular) the plural of jinni
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jinn

(dʒɪn)

also jin•ni

(dʒɪˈni, ˈdʒɪn i)

n., pl. jinns also jin•nis, (esp. collectively) jinn also jin•ni.
(in Islamic myth) any of a class of spirits, lower than the angels, capable of appearing in human and animal forms and influencing humankind.
[1675–85; pl. of Arabic jinnī demon]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

jinn

An Arab name for a spirit.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations

jinn

nDschinn m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
With his newfound wealth and the power of the jinnis who inhabit the ring and the lantern, Aladdin is able to win her hand and build a great palace.
Once this desert was green with forests, and its capital was called the City of Jinnis. Jinnis are spirits of the forest, living in trees though able to move freely in many forms.
"It would be impossible in this space to do justice to Wecker's humongous research into golems and jinnis and what lower Manhattan was like before World War I, but, suffice it to say, she has done her homework.
The Arabic folklore has jinnis (spirits) and flying carpets, magic rings and the likes but it is combined in a modern, fresh way with my own 'crazy' imagination.
He takes his battles, his son Garba Gagare on his side, even into the surreal world of ghosts and Jinnis. But the central concern of this work, especially as it relates to this study, is Gandoki's attitude to Europeans.