jinxed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.

jinx

 (jĭngks)
n.
1. A person or thing that is believed to bring bad luck.
2. A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing.
tr.v. jinxed, jinx·ing, jinx·es
To bring bad luck to.

[Possibly from jynx, wryneck (from its use in witchcraft), from Latin iynx, from Greek iunx, perhaps from iuzein, to call, cry.]

jinxed

(dʒɪŋkst)
adj
considered to be unlucky or to bring bad luck
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.jinxed - (usually used colloquially) causing or accompanied by misfortune
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
luckless, unlucky - having or bringing misfortune; "Friday the 13th is an unlucky date"
Translations

jinxed

[ˈdʒɪŋkst] adj (= unlucky) [player, project] → maudit(e)
to be jinxed → être maudit(e)

jinxed

adjverhext
References in periodicals archive ?
Watson broke his jaw at England's infamous bloodbath in Brighton last season, missing the autumn internationals and Blackadder reckons his side are jinxed.
"Gareth Bale freekick jinxed by Tal Ben Haim witchcraft," ran The Telegraph's headline, while the 101 Goals Website blamed the "jinxed kick" on Ben Haim's "bizarre magical sorcery."
Is the Manager of the Month award jinxed in non-League too?
They found that those who knocked down (away from themselves) or threw a ball believed that a jinxed negative outcome was less likely than participants who knocked up (toward themselves) or held a ball.
A week after getting a ' cursed door' to his chamber in the assembly opened, he has ordered his staff to renovate the ' jinxed' Cauvery bungalow.
The manager thought I was jinxed in games against Ayr and Cowdenbeath.
ENGLAND'S jinxed rugby hero Jonny Wilkinson faces several weeks out of the game with his latest injury.
Two half-brothers, seemingly jinxed and doomed to a life of causing unintended misery, try to find some way out of their dilemma in writer-director Sebastian Borensztein's amusing if limited comedy, "The Die Is Cast." Mordant tone is pitched in a more mainstream register for Argentine auds than in Martin Rejtman's deadpan piece de resistance "The Magic Gloves," while slapstick aspects are toned down to attract more discriminating viewers.
And he brushed aside any suggestions he is injury jinxed despite being nearly two years on the sidelines following a neck operation and a knee injury.