jive

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jive

early jazz; Slang. meaningless talk; to tease, fool, kid: Don’t jive me with your sweet talk.
Not to be confused with:
gibe – jeer; taunt; deride: They gibe him whenever he tries to speak.
jibe – shift sails; be in agreement: Her explanation is likely to jibe with what he said.

jive

 (jīv)
n.
1.
a. Jazz or swing music.
b. The jargon of jazz musicians and enthusiasts.
2. Slang Deceptive, nonsensical, or glib talk: "the sexist, locker-room jive of men boasting and bonding" (Trip Gabriel).
v. jived, jiv·ing, jives
v.intr.
1. To play or dance to jive music.
2. Slang
a. To talk in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way.
b. To talk or chat: "You just jive in one big group, putting each other on, trying to top the last line" (Time).
3. (Usage Problem) To be in accord.
v.tr. Slang
To speak to (someone) in an exaggerated, teasing, or misleading way.
adj. Slang
Misleading, phony, or worthless: talking jive nonsense.

[Origin unknown.]

jiv′er n.
jiv′ey, jiv′y adj.
Usage Note: The verb jive is often used in place of its near sound-alike jibe to mean "to be compatible, agree." The Usage Panel views this as a mistake. In our 2004 survey, 93 percent of the Panel rejected the sentence The two accounts of the incident didn't quite jive.

jive

(dʒaɪv)
n
1. (Dancing) a style of lively and jerky dance performed to jazz and, later, to rock and roll, popular esp in the 1940s and 1950s
2. Also called: jive talk a variety of American slang spoken chiefly by Black people, esp jazz musicians
3.
a. slang chiefly US deliberately misleading or deceptive talk
b. (as modifier): jive talk.
vb
4. (Dancing) (intr) to dance the jive
5. slang chiefly US to mislead; tell lies (to)
[C20: of unknown origin]
ˈjiver n

jive

(dʒaɪv)

n., v. jived, jiv•ing,
adj. n.
1. swing music or early jazz.
2. the jargon associated with swing music and early jazz.
3. Slang. deceptive, exaggerated, or meaningless talk.
v.i.
4. to play jive.
5. to dance to jive; jitterbug.
6. Slang. to engage in kidding, teasing, or exaggeration.
v.t.
7. Slang. to tease; fool; kid.
adj.
8. Slang. insincere or deceptive.
[1925–30, Amer.; orig. obscure]
jiv′ey, adj. jiv•i•er, jiv•i•est.

jive


Past participle: jived
Gerund: jiving

Imperative
jive
jive
Present
I jive
you jive
he/she/it jives
we jive
you jive
they jive
Preterite
I jived
you jived
he/she/it jived
we jived
you jived
they jived
Present Continuous
I am jiving
you are jiving
he/she/it is jiving
we are jiving
you are jiving
they are jiving
Present Perfect
I have jived
you have jived
he/she/it has jived
we have jived
you have jived
they have jived
Past Continuous
I was jiving
you were jiving
he/she/it was jiving
we were jiving
you were jiving
they were jiving
Past Perfect
I had jived
you had jived
he/she/it had jived
we had jived
you had jived
they had jived
Future
I will jive
you will jive
he/she/it will jive
we will jive
you will jive
they will jive
Future Perfect
I will have jived
you will have jived
he/she/it will have jived
we will have jived
you will have jived
they will have jived
Future Continuous
I will be jiving
you will be jiving
he/she/it will be jiving
we will be jiving
you will be jiving
they will be jiving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jiving
you have been jiving
he/she/it has been jiving
we have been jiving
you have been jiving
they have been jiving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jiving
you will have been jiving
he/she/it will have been jiving
we will have been jiving
you will have been jiving
they will have been jiving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jiving
you had been jiving
he/she/it had been jiving
we had been jiving
you had been jiving
they had been jiving
Conditional
I would jive
you would jive
he/she/it would jive
we would jive
you would jive
they would jive
Past Conditional
I would have jived
you would have jived
he/she/it would have jived
we would have jived
you would have jived
they would have jived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jive - a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930sjive - a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930s; flowing rhythms but less complex than later styles of jazz
jazz - a genre of popular music that originated in New Orleans around 1900 and developed through increasingly complex styles
Verb1.jive - dance to jive music; dance the jive
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"

jive

verb
Slang. To tease or mock good-humoredly:
Informal: kid, rib, ride.
Slang: rag, razz.
Translations
hämätätanssia

jive

[dʒaɪv]
A. N
1. (= music, dancing) → swing m
2. (US) (= big talk) → alardes mpl, palabrería f; (= nonsense) → chorradas fpl; (= slang used by Black people) (also jive talk) → jerga f (de la población negra norteamericana, en especial de los músicos de jazz)
don't give me all that jivedeja de decir chorradas
B. VI
1. (= dance) → bailar el swing
2. (= be kidding) → bromear

jive

[ˈdʒaɪv]
vi (= dance) → danser le rock, danser le swing
n
(= music) → rock m, swing m
(= dance) → rock m, swing m

jive

n
(= dance)Swing m
(US inf: = nonsense) don’t give me that jivehör bloß mit dem Quatsch auf (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
Ex-JLS star Aston, 31, and former Pussycat Doll Kimberly, 37, led 5,000 jivers who broke the Guinness record of 25 hours and two minutes.
Local heroes jump jivers King Pleasure And The Biscuit Boys; Ricky Cool And The In Crowd, who still inhabit the world of the 1960s Flamingo Club; jazz canaries Abi K, Judy Blu, Deborah Rose, Sheila Waterfield, Lisa Carter and Bille Baker and arch-bebopper Chris Bowden will also take part.
Their romping Dixieland jazz, straight out of 1940s Chicago makes them the odds-on favourite for Band of the Festival." Local heroes jump jivers King Pleasure & The Biscuit Boys; Ricky Cool and the In Crowd, who still inhabit the world of the 1960s Flamingo Club; jazz canaries Abi K, Judy Blu, Deborah Rose, Sheila Waterfield, Lisa Carter and Bille Baker and arch-bebopper Chris Bowden will take part.
From the early 1960s, rock bands gradually changed the scene with jivers, boppers and rockers hitting the dance floor.
They loved jiving, they were really good jivers. She loves it and she watches it about four times in the week as well."
In a show the whole family can enjoy, experience the excitement of the sound of this incredible orchestra and marvel at the pure energy of The Swingtime Jivers. The show features the fabulous harmonies of the Moonlight Serenaders and the sublime vocals of Catherine Sykes and Colin Anthony, as well as the sound and hits of the Andrews Sisters, and special guest stars, the Polka Dot Dolls.
A packed city centre saw performances from all corners of the globe, from traditional Filipino dancers to 1920s American-inspired jumping jivers.
Onlookers were treated to performances from all corners of the globe, from traditional Filipino dancers to 1920s American-inspired jumping jivers.
Thomas Hotel, Somerset Disco Inferno - Tributes to Earth Wind & Fire and The Bee Gees PS469 PS235 19 Apr 3 Nidd Hall Hotel, North Yorkshire Showtime with Celtic Dreams PS469 PS235 22 Apr 4 Lakeside Coastal Village, Hampshire Music, Laughter, Shows & Dancing where every night is different PS308 PS170 26 Apr 3 Bembridge Coast Hotel, Isle of Wight Joey & The Jivers plus tributes to Roy Orbison & Tony Christie PS369 PS185 26 Apr 3 Cricket St.
Each number had the crowd clapping and singing along followed by continuous applause, and the jivers had a ball.