burnout

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burn·out

 (bûrn′out′)
n.
1. A failure in a device attributable to burning, excessive heat, or friction.
2. Aerospace
a. The termination of rocket or jet-engine operation because of fuel exhaustion or shutoff.
b. The point at which this termination occurs.
3.
a. Physical or emotional exhaustion, especially as a result of long-term stress or dissipation.
b. One who is worn out physically or emotionally, as from long-term stress.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

burn•out

(ˈbɜrnˌaʊt)

n.
1. the termination of effective combustion in a rocket engine, due to exhaustion of propellant.
2. the breakdown of a lamp, motor, or other electrical device due to heat caused by current flow.
3. fatigue, frustration, or apathy resulting from prolonged stress, overwork, or intense activity.
4. Slang. druggie.
[1900–05]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

burnout

The point in time or in the missile trajectory when combustion of fuels in the rocket engine is terminated by other than programmed cutoff.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
Translations

burnout

burn-out [ˈbɜːrnaʊt] népuisement f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

burnout

n desgaste m (profesional), agotamiento (profesional)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
KEYWORDS: Family support, Job burnout, Nursing profession, Working environment.
In the United States alone, job burnout accounts for an estimated $125 to $190 billion in health-care spending each year and has been attributed to type 2 diabetes, gastrointestinal issues, coronary heart disease, high cholesterol and even death before reaching age 45.
A review and an integration of research on job burnout. Acad Manage Rev.
Lambert EG, Altheimer I, Hogan NL (2010a) Exploring the relationship between social support and job burnout among correctional staff.
David Ballard, of the American Psychological Association described job burnout as 'an extended period of time where someone experiences exhaustion and a lack of interest in things, resulting in a decline in their job performance.'
Evidence has pointed to a close connection between job burnout due to the demands of the organization and job resources, defined as those elements in the environment that are reserved to keep the function of the individual and organization working (Hsieh, 2014).
A meta-analytic examination of the correlates of the three dimensions of job burnout. Journal of Applied Psychology, 81(2), 123-133.
Lu and Gursoy (2016) propose that burnout is likely to lead to job dissatisfaction and thus, companies and researchers should focus their attention on the factors that influence job burnout, particularly for internal auditors.
This is the also making accepted attitude in all situation resulted lesser friction and lesser job burnout. Stress is a major public health problem and one of the approaches to address this problem is through yoga.
A 2017 National Academy of Medicine paper, co-authored by Shanafelt, found that more than half of US physicians experienced "substantial symptoms" of job burnout. Shanafelt spoke to California Healthline recently about his work.
Although job burnout is not inevitable and there are many things organizations can do to decrease the chances of it happening, the numbers suggest that there is a crisis in how workers are managed.
To understand job burnout further, we need to know about stress, job stress, strain, burnout and the prevalence of those in higher education institutions.