job-hop

job-hop

(jŏb′hŏp′)
intr.v. job-hopped, job-hop·ping, job-hops Informal
To change jobs frequently, especially as a means of quick financial gain or career advancement.

job′-hop′per n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

job-hop

vb (intr)
to change jobs, esp frequently
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

job′-hop`



v.i. -hopped, -hop•ping.
to change jobs frequently.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Workers aged between 16 and 24 are most likely to job-hop, to further their career or achieve a better worklife balance, said the report.
Only a small minority (about 15 percent) of those surveyed job-hop out of preference.
Businesses need to accept the fact that some employees will inevitably job-hop, but that doesn't make them completely powerless to tackle this issue.
Another factor is the tendency of millennials to "job-hop." In 2016, American-based research and consulting film Gallup revealed that the millennial generation - those born between 1980 and 1996 - are less willing to stay in their current jobs, with around 21 percent of them saying that they've changed jobs within the past year.
Millennial employees are no more likely to job-hop than Generation X workers did when they were young adults, statistics show.
Robins is reluctant to job-hop after a good but short spell at the Sky Blues, while Town would have to pay struggling Latics compensation for Jones.
If they job-hop from one job to the next hoping to figure out their true calling, they have done themselves a disservice because they have not developed what the author refers to as "career capital."
As a result, a majority of star analysts who left their original jobs continued to job-hop.
This young workforce will job-hop when they see no other choice.
To stay ahead of their competitors, Japanese high-tech manufacturers need to protect their cutting-edge technologies-something that can be better achieved in Japan, where companies have a more loyal work force, contrary to China, where workers frequently job-hop for better pay.
People now expect to job-hop through their careers, so a different kind of benefit - one which is adapted to the needs of each employee - is emerging.
A new brand of mercenary candidates are cashing in on low unemployment and an abundance of vacancies to job-hop across the UK, according to recruitment firm HMI Accountability.