job-hop

(redirected from job-hopper)

job-hop

(jŏb′hŏp′)
intr.v. job-hopped, job-hop·ping, job-hops Informal
To change jobs frequently, especially as a means of quick financial gain or career advancement.

job′-hop′per n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

job-hop

vb (intr)
to change jobs, esp frequently
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

job′-hop`



v.i. -hopped, -hop•ping.
to change jobs frequently.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
have been a lifelong job-hopper, but not as a means of quick financial gain, but only to find my niche.
Pardlo's journey from aimless job-hopper to successful writer and partner in a fruitful second marriage isn't so much described in detail as employed as a launch pad for philosophical musings.
Fortunately, your previously stable work history should eliminate any job-hopper concerns, and your need for full-time work requires little explanation.
Dubai: Not too long ago, it was probably easy to spot a job-hopper, but it looks like times are changing.
Millennials are often saddled with the "job-hopper" label, and it appears to be largely well-earned.
Don't be a job-hopper. I wouldn't point to it as a hard rule, but I would say that while you probably don't want to work for one employer your entire career, you also don't want to move every three years.
Those who do not go through the return-to-duty process and continue to drive are called job-hoppers. A job-hopper tests positive for one carrier; is fired, quits, or is not hired; and subsequently tests negative on a preemployment test for another carrier.
Nielson is obviously not a job-hopper; his preparations suggest that he knows what he's getting into.
Pete is not your classic job-hopper. He had been at his previous job six years!
The application can also reveal something more: a job-hopper who has held a number of positions in three or four years.
This not only keeps you from looking like a job-hopper, but also paints a more accurate picture of your recent work history.