jobseeker


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jobseeker

(ˈdʒɒbsiːkə)
n
(Social Welfare) social welfare an unemployed person who is receiving jobseeker's allowance
References in periodicals archive ?
Anyone looking for work can contact Jobseeker Direct on 0845 6060 234 from 9am to 6pm Monday to Friday, and 9am to 1pm on Saturdays.
With around 3000 vacancies on offer, each requiring varying levels of skill and experience, there is something to suit every jobseeker, from students to lone parents - even people considering a career change.
Employment Minister Grace Grace is urging Logan businesses to hire a jobseeker and put themselves in line for support payments of up to $20,000 under the Palaszczuk Governments expanded Back to Work jobs program.
It is the older jobseeker, aged 35 and above, who feels the most let down by the work programme, with 42% of respondents in this age group rating the service as a one out of 10.
She added: "372 jobseeker payments have been reduced since the introduction of these arrangements.
Employers expect a jobseeker to know who they are, what they do, where they operate, and how they compare with others in the industry--especially since such information is readily available online.
Prior to the project, only every third jobseeker felt optimistic about landing the right private sector job.
As a jobseeker myself I have to prove that I have been looking for work every time I "sign on" by producing my job search diary.
The average jobseeker from Qatar expected to earn pounds 62,000 a year, and job seekers from Saudi Arabia expect over pounds 40,000, double the expectations of the average Briton, who wanted just over pounds 20,000.
When a jobseeker uses an active method not specifically listed in the survey, it is recorded in the "other methods" category.
The RJCP significantly increased the level of misery associated with passive welfare by allowing the jobseeker engagement rate to drop to around 5 per cent.