jocoserious

jocoserious

(ˌdʒəʊkəʊˈsɪərɪəs)
adj
mixing humour and seriousness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The mention of twilight reinforces that possibility, which might take us in a jocoserious way to the vampire and Nightwood's place in a Gothic tradition.
Although Boenig meticulously parses how and why White's jocoserious version of Merlin in The Once and Future King so provoked Lewis, he remains sensitive to White and Lewis's differing aesthetic, moral, and political agendas.
At one point Aristotle is "jocoserious," and he engages in u-turns, judo throws, and "holding his nose." I suppose--or, as we Straussians now say--I am inclined to believe, that Pangle deploys each of these terms with intent, and that as a group they are meant to remind us of our inferior station and Aristotle's unusually well-disguised levity.
Bell, Jocoserious Joyce: The Fate of Folly in Ulysses, (Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1995); Tim Prentki, The Fool in European Theatre: Stages of Folly, (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012); Preston M.
(17) Calderon made Perez de Moya and Vitoria's works the basis of his treatment of myth, as did the epigones Juan Bautista Diamante (Alfeo y Aretusa, 1672), Agustin de Torres y Salazar (Triunfo y venganza de Amor, 1681), and Marcos de Lanuza, count of Clavijo (Jupiter, y Yoo, los cielos apremian desdenes, published 1699), who saw the mythological comedia to its final jocoserious stage.
But the work is also a provocative literalization of the Minimalists' sculptural turn to the horizontal, and a jocoserious gloss on Fried's theatricality.
Instead of being merely humorous or deadly serious, Homer's gods are (to borrow a Joycean coinage) jocoserious. (47) The jarring incongruity of high tragedy and low comedy violates protocols of decorum, and disturbed commentators in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries who were devoted to decorum.
Opening up a link from Erasmus, to Huizinga, to Zweig, Coetzee takes delight in The Praise of Folly in "its jocoserious abnegation of big-phallus status, its evasive (non)position inside/outside the play--just as its weakness lies in its power to grow, to propagate itself, to beget Erasmians" (1996:103), one of whom Coetzee implies himself to be.
A bookish Briton writing while imperial war again loomed in the aftermath of 9/11, Keymer is especially sensitive to the pain of history in Sterne's jocoserious (a favourite word) novel.
Jocoserious Joyce is devoted to the humour in Ulysses, interpreted in relation to its serious meanings.
Bell, Jocoserious Joyce: The Fate of Folly in "Ulysses" (Ithaca: Cornell Univ.
weakness--its jocoserious abnegation of big-phallus