Johnson


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john·son

 (jŏn′sən) Vulgar Slang
n.
The penis.

[From the name Johnson.]

Johnson

(ˈdʒɒnsən)
n
1. (Biography) Amy 1903–41, British aviator, who made several record flights, including those to Australia (1930) and to Cape Town and back (1936)
2. (Biography) Andrew 1808–75, US Democrat statesman who was elected vice president under the Republican Abraham Lincoln; 17th president of the US (1865–69), became president after Lincoln's assassination. His lenience towards the South after the American Civil War led to strong opposition from radical Republicans, who tried to impeach him
3. (Biography) (Alexander) Boris (de Pfeffel). born 1964, British Conservative politician; mayor of London from 2008
4. (Biography) Earvin (ˈɜːvɪn), known as Magic. born 1959, US basketball player
5. (Biography) Eyvind (ˈevɪnt). 1900–76, Swedish novelist and writer, whose novels include the Krilon trilogy (1941–43): joint winner of the Nobel prize for literature 1974
6. (Biography) Jack 1878–1946, US boxer; world heavyweight champion (1908–15)
7. (Biography) Lionel (Pigot) 1867–1902, British poet and critic, best known for his poems "Dark Angel" and "By the Statue of King Charles at Charing Cross"
8. (Biography) Lyndon Baines known as LBJ. 1908–73, US Democrat statesman; 36th president of the US (1963–69). His administration carried the Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965, but he lost popularity by increasing US involvement in the Vietnam war
9. (Biography) Martin. born 1970, English Rugby Union footballer; captain of the England team that won the World Cup in 2003.
10. (Biography) Michael (Duane) born 1967, US athlete: world (1995) and Olympic (1996) 200- and 400-metre gold medallist
11. (Biography) Philip (Cortelyou). 1906–2005, US architect and writer; his buildings include the New York State Theater (1964) and the American Telephone and Telegraph building (1978–83), both in New York
12. (Biography) Robert ?1898–1937, US blues singer and guitarist
13. (Biography) Samuel known as Dr. Johnson. 1709–84, British lexicographer, critic, and conversationalist, whose greatest works are his Dictionary (1755), his edition of Shakespeare (1765), and his Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets (1779–81). His fame, however, rests as much on Boswell's biography of him as on his literary output

John•son

(ˈdʒɒn sən)

n.
1. Andrew, 1808–75, 17th president of the U.S. 1865–69.
2. Ey•vind (ˈeɪ vɪn) 1900–76, Swedish writer: Nobel prize 1974.
3. James Price, 1891–1955, U.S. pianist and jazz composer.
4. Lyndon Baines, 1908–73, 36th president of the U.S. 1963–69.
5. Philip C(ortelyou), born 1906, U.S. architect.
6. Richard Mentor, 1780–1850, vice president of the U.S. 1837–41.
7. Samuel ( “Dr. Johnson” ), 1709–84, English lexicographer and writer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Johnson - English writer and lexicographer (1709-1784)Johnson - English writer and lexicographer (1709-1784)
2.Johnson - 36th President of the United StatesJohnson - 36th President of the United States; was elected vice president and succeeded Kennedy when Kennedy was assassinated (1908-1973)
3.Johnson - 17th President of the United StatesJohnson - 17th President of the United States; was elected vice president and succeeded Lincoln when Lincoln was assassinated; was impeached but acquitted by one vote (1808-1875)
Translations
Jensen
Johansen
Johansson

johnson

n (US sl: = penis) → Schwanz m (sl)
References in classic literature ?
SAMUEL JOHNSON was the son of a country bookseller, and he was born at Lichfield in 1709.
Johnson mounted on the back of one, and the other two supported him, one on each side.
Johnson and his lady embarked, taking Grandfather's chair along with them, was called the Arbella, in honor of the lady herself.
My second officer, Porfirio Johnson, was also often on the bridge.
Johnson was telling me about her in a short chat I had with him during yesterday's second dog-watch.
(*She was free.I had changed my name from Frederick BAILEY to that of JOHNSON.)arrival at Newport, we were so anxious to get to a place of safety, that, notwithstanding we lacked the necessary money to pay our fare, we decided to take seats in the stage, and promise to pay when we got to New Bedford.
Johnson as ever, you must come to me at 10 Wigmore street; but I hope this may not be the case, for as Mr.
"Have you completed all the necessary preparations incident to Miss Sedley's departure, Miss Jemima?" asked Miss Pinkerton herself, that majestic lady; the Semiramis of Hammersmith, the friend of Doctor Johnson, the correspondent of Mrs.
Johnson's repeatedly quoted description of the style can scarcely be improved on--'familiar but not coarse, and elegant but not ostentatious.'
"This hop will be worth thirty runs to us to-morrow, and will be the making of Raggles and Johnson," thinks the young leader, as he revolves many things in his mind, standing by the side of Mr.
That is the fault of my position--not of myself, Mr Johnson. My position as a mutual friend requires it, sir.' Mr Folair paused with a most impressive look, and diving into the hat before noticed, drew from thence a small piece of whity-brown paper curiously folded, whence he brought forth a note which it had served to keep clean, and handing it over to Nicholas, said--
In accordance with this rule it may safely be assumed that the forefathers of Boston had built the first prison-house somewhere in the Vicinity of Cornhill, almost as seasonably as they marked out the first burial-ground, on Isaac Johnson's lot, and round about his grave, which subsequently became the nucleus of all the congregated sepulchres in the old churchyard of King's Chapel.

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