Johnson grass

(redirected from johnsongrass)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to johnsongrass: Sorghum halepense

Johnson grass

or john·son·grass (jŏn′sən-grăs′)
n.
A tall rhizomatous perennial grass (Sorghum halepense) native to the Mediterranean region, sometimes cultivated for forage but widespread as a weed.

[After William Johnson (died 1859), American agriculturalist.]

Johnson grass

or

johnsongrass

n
(Plants) a persistent perennial Mediterranean grass, Sorghum halepense, cultivated for hay and pasture in the US where it also grows as a weed. See also sorghum
[C19: named after William Johnson (died 1859), American agriculturalist who introduced it]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Johnson grass - tall perennial grass that spreads by creeping rhizomes and is grown for fodderJohnson grass - tall perennial grass that spreads by creeping rhizomes and is grown for fodder; naturalized in southern United States where it is a serious pest on cultivated land
sorghum - economically important Old World tropical cereal grass
References in periodicals archive ?
Genetic population structure of sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari, in sorghum, sugarcane, and johnsongrass in the continental USA.
All roadsides contained dense grasses of various species and heights, including Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium), and sprangletop (Leptochloa fusca), as well as some forbs including burningbush (Bassia scoparia).
Clethodim has proven equally good at controlling both annual and perennial grasses, particularly Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.) in sesame [5].
Hosts: the species is a grass generalist and was reported from Johnsongrass Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers., wild cane S.
ha-1 provide 90 - 99% control on grassy weeds of johnsongrass and barnyardgrass and broadleaf of velvetleaf and prickly sida in Mississippi field experiment.
Its ability to grow rhizomes led Paterson to another plant that might lend some of its resiliency to sorghum: Johnsongrass. Considered by farmers and gardeners to be a noxious weed, Johnsongrass is prolific at growing rhizomes, spreading itself into fields and garden plots and pastures throughout the U.S.
13: Johnsongrass can give your animals cyanide poisoning if it is young or has been damaged by cutting or trampling.
En Venezuela, han sido identificados varios virus que infectan este cereal, los cuales son: virus del mosaico del maiz o "enanismo rayado" (Maize mosaic nucleorhabdovirus, MMV) (Malaguti, 2000), virus del mosaico de la cana de azucar (Sugarcane mosaic potyvirus, SCMV) (D'Lima y Garrido, 1995), virus del estriado del maiz u "hoja blanca" {Maize stripe tenuivirus, MSpV) (Lastra y Trujillo, 1977), virus del rayado fino del maiz (Maize rayado fino marafivirus, MRFV) (Lastra y Cuello, 1980), virus del mosaico enanizante del maiz (Maize dwarf mosaic potyvirus, MDMV) (Garrido y Trujillo, 1988) y virus del mosaico del pasto iohnson (Johnsongrass mosaic potyvirus, JGMV) (Marino et al., 2010).
Bicellular trichomes of johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) leaves morphology, histochemistry and function.
Lepus alleni was rarely encountered in thick, matted stands of Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense) or tangled thickets of mesquites and other thorny plants such as lotewood and pricklypear.
with the R biotype of Johnsongrass against graminicides where the initial injury was 30 to 60% (Kevin and Edward 2001).