joky


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

jok·ey

also jok·y  (jō′kē)
adj. jok·i·er, jok·i·est
Characterized by joking or jokes, especially stale or clumsy jokes: jokey bumper stickers.

jok′i·ly adv.
jok′i·ness n.
Translations

joky

adjlustig
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
jolly is the gale, And a joker is the whale, A' flourishin' his tail, -- Such a funny, sporty, gamy, jesty, joky, hoky-poky lad, is the Ocean, oh!
Even so, the excellent American Visionary Art Museum's souvenir shop tries to turn a negative into a joky positive by adorning T-shirts and mugs with: "There's more than murder here."
The atmosphere was actually quite tense, the joky chatter which had filled the lift dying away as the group tried to figure out what would happen next.
The ordinary beginnings of Goldstone - this self-deprecating, brash, openly gay, joky, Jewish Manc, with an off-the-wall sense of humour - don't fit the profile of a spinner of the dark arts of political subterfuge.
The joky comic book action gives freakshow costumed capers a happy face.
It is book likely to appeal to all keen young readers--as long as they are not unnerved by its deliberately joky ambiguous conclusion!
And although he admits he doesn't see it, he has issued a joky denial statement.
Keynote speakers: Mayan Elders Grandfather Cirilo, Hunbatz Men, and Don Pedro Pablo Chuc Pech, Flordemayo a member of the Council of the 13 Indigenous Grandmothers, Stephen Mehler M.A., Crystal Skulls guardians: Michele Nocerino, DaEl and Laurie Walker, Jaap van Etten PhD, Sherry Whitfield, Joky van Dieten, Jane Doherty, Kirby Seid, Grace, Mario Bojorquez, Boris Schneickert, the Atlantean Orb guardian Arthur Fanning, Fire the Grid presentation by Shelley Yates, Jodie Serota along with the Mystery guardian and her 33lb Ancient Crystal Skull to be revealed out in public audience for viewing for the very first time, according to the late F.R.
Such a funny, sporty, gamy, jesty, joky, hoky-poky lad, is the Ocean, oh!
More important, recognition of the pierrot as the outmoded garment behind the deletions on page 67 of Volume the Third confirms Doody's highly astute deductions as to the cultural significance of these deletions--while bearing out her compelling, critical account of how Austen reclothed her "rough, violent, sexy, joky" (98) writings of the revolutionary decade of the 1790s in a "Regency walking dress" of at least ostensible decorum and propriety.
In her contemporary fantasy, Huff's style, colloquial, joky, and full of attitude, does not encourage the reader to take supernatural good or evil seriously, and in a rather predictable compromise, while Hell appears full face, the Christian god remains peripheral.