jolter


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jolt

 (jōlt)
v. jolt·ed, jolt·ing, jolts
v.tr.
1. To move or dislodge with a sudden, hard blow; strike heavily or jarringly: jolted his opponent with a heavy punch; an impact that jolted the mailbox loose.
2. To cause to move jerkily: stops and starts that jolted the passengers.
3. To put into a specified condition by or as if by a blow: "Now and then he jolted a nodding reader awake by inserting a witty paragraph" (Walter Blair).
4. To make suddenly active or effective: The remark jolted my memory.
5. To disturb suddenly and severely; stun: She was jolted by the betrayal of her trusted friend.
v.intr.
To proceed in an irregular, bumpy, or jerky fashion.
n.
1. A sudden jarring or jerking motion, as from a blow.
2.
a. A sudden, strong feeling of surprise or disappointment; a shock.
b. The cause of such a feeling: His resignation was a jolt to the whole staff.
3. A brief strong portion: a jolt of whiskey.

[Origin unknown.]

jolt′er n.
jolt′i·ly adv.
jolt′y adj.
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