journalese


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jour·nal·ese

 (jûr′nə-lēz′, -lēs′)
n.
The style of writing often held to be characteristic of newspapers and magazines, distinguished by clichés, sensationalism, and triteness of thought.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

journalese

(ˌdʒɜːnəˈliːz)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) derogatory a superficial cliché-ridden style of writing regarded as typical of newspapers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jour•nal•ese

(ˌdʒɜr nlˈiz, -ˈis)

n.
a style of writing regarded as typical of newspapers and magazines.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

journalese

language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.
See also: Media
language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.
See also: Language Style
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.journalese - the style in which newspapers are written
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
luridness, sensationalism - the journalistic use of subject matter that appeals to vulgar tastes; "the tabloids relied on sensationalism to maintain their circulation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

journalese

[ˈdʒɜːnəˈliːz] N (pej) → jerga f periodística
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

journalese

[ˌdʒɜːrnəˈliːz] n (pejorative)jargon m journalistique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

journalese

nZeitungs- or Pressejargon m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

journalese

[ˈdʒɜːnəˈliːz] n (pej) → giornalese
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
In Journalese, to perform upon a musical instrument; as, "He presided at the piccolo."
The joyful journalese revealed that it was beyond question their boy, and it soothed Mrs.
Crystal and Davy (1973) note about these four types of sentence that in journalese writing, including editorials, it is the declarative type which is the most preferred.
The former, it was said, might be financially self-supporting, and it was also remarked that the suggested name, Koinonia, "would have no appeal for the general public" (44) Visser 't Hooft, however, declared himself to be firmly opposed to the idea of a "popular" magazine: "He said that it was impossible to produce a popular journal internationally, because in it one would have to use the 'journalese' of a particular country which would be unacceptable in other countries." There was already a plan in Britain to produce a "popular" national ecumenical journal, he noted, and this might be followed in other countries.
It is the journalese version of the scriptural verses of lamentation.
The fascinated critic asks: "Is it a kind of esoteric message?" to which the crestfallen author replies: "Ah my dear fellow, it can't be described in cheap journalese!" Begging for a clue to guide his new research agenda, the critic is told:
He had no truck with my defence that this was pacy journalese rather than a grammar by-pass.
A range of perspectives from different disciplines compels our attention to the intersection of literature and journalism: Benedict Anderson's "imagined communities" in relation to the newspaper; Walter Benjamin's flaneur who dabbles, among other things, in journalese; and media studies' "literary journalism."
"Sequencers in different text genres: Academic writing, journalese and fiction".
Among 64 productions by the subjects, the correct stress placed on last syllable in these suffixed words were Four on Nepalese, while six on journalese, four on Novelese and four on Sudanese.
In street-corner journalese, 'nakatulog sa pansitan' (fell asleep at the noodle house) or caught sleeping on the job.