joylessness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

joy·less

 (joi′lĭs)
adj.
Cheerless; dismal.

joy′less·ly adv.
joy′less·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.joylessness - a feeling of dismal cheerlessness
cheerlessness, uncheerfulness - a feeling of dreary or pessimistic sadness
References in classic literature ?
They stood fixed, their baffled hearts looking out of their eyes with a joylessness pitiful to see.
I have heard many noises since, but nothing that gave me such an intimate impression of the savage instincts hidden in the breast of mankind; these yells of festivity suggested agonizing fear, rage of murder, ferocity of lust, and the irremediable joylessness of human condition: yet they were emitted by people who were convinced that they were amusing themselves supremely, traditionally, with the sanction of ages, with the approval of their conscience - and no mistake about it whatever!
Potter made watching Swansea enjoyable again - no mean feat, considering the previous two or three years of joylessness on show in Landore.
This was Roy Keane telling Ian Wright and Gary Neville not to get carried away after two wins -- and that pair collapsing in giggles at his joylessness.
Her joylessness is shared by the characters in the works of Jeanne Mammen, who worked for satirical and fashion magazines.
Slimani plainly describes the dull plodding joylessness of daily life with small children and the painful diminution of female occupation after childbirth.
The sentiments of disaffection, joylessness and injustice that plague the narrative become attenuated in a poignant concluding scene of female bonding that sees the friends respond jointly to the call of Felix's family for public assistance in locating witnesses to the crime.
That's the message of Ralitza Petrova's debut feature "Godless," a film that goes to great lengths to rub the viewer's face in the joylessness of life in a post-Communist world where nothing has changed.
it is not wonder, but rather the social enthusiasm which results from the sordidness of mean streets and the joylessness of withered lives, that is the beginning of economic science (Pigou 1920, 5).
Brown also shared cautionary tales about the effects of lack of play in the lives of children, citing research that demonstrated an absence of empathy, increase in depression and interpersonal conflict leading to joylessness, workaholism and addiction in adults deprived of play in their youth.
Third, they have also offered evidence of the beginnings of a self-consciousness about the ultimate joylessness of this form of embodiment, which points to weaknesses in the hegemony of neoliberalism that could potentially be the focus of resistance.