judicial


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Related to judicial: judicial activism

ju·di·cial

 (jo͞o-dĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Law
a. Of, relating to, or proper to courts of law or to the administration of justice: the judicial system.
b. Decreed by or proceeding from a court of justice: a judicial decision.
c. Belonging or appropriate to the office of a judge: in judicial robes.
2. Characterized by or expressing judgment: the judicial function of a literary critic.
3. Proceeding from a divine judgment.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin iūdiciālis, from iūdicium, judgment, from iūdex, iūdic-, judge; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ju·di′cial·ly adv.

judicial

(dʒuːˈdɪʃəl)
adj
1. (Law) of or relating to the administration of justice
2. (Law) of or relating to judgment in a court of law or to a judge exercising this function
3. inclined to pass judgment; discriminating
4. (Law) allowed or enforced by a court of law: a decree of judicial separation.
5. (Law) having qualities appropriate to a judge
6. (Law) giving or seeking judgment, esp determining or seeking determination of a contested issue
[C14: from Latin jūdiciālis belonging to the law courts, from jūdicium judgment, from jūdex a judge]
juˈdicially adv

ju•di•cial

(dʒuˈdɪʃ əl)

adj.
1. pertaining to judgment in courts of justice or to the administration of justice: judicial proceedings.
2. pertaining to courts of law or to judges; judiciary: judicial functions.
3. proper to the character of a judge, esp. fair and impartial.
4. inclined to make or give judgments; critical; discriminating.
5. decreed, sanctioned, or enforced by a court: a judicial decision.
6. giving or seeking judgment, as in a dispute or contest.
7. inflicted by God as a judgment.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin jūdiciālis of the law courts =jūdici(um) judgment (see judge, -ium1) + -ālis -al1]
ju•di′cial•ly, adv.

judicial

Belonging to, appropriate to, or characteristic of a court or the administration of justice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.judicial - decreed by or proceeding from a court of justice; "a judicial decision"
legal - established by or founded upon law or official or accepted rules
2.judicial - belonging or appropriate to the office of a judge; "judicial robes"
3.judicial - relating to the administration of justice or the function of a judge; "judicial system"
4.judicial - expressing careful judgment; "discriminative censure"; "a biography ...appreciative and yet judicial in purpose"-Tyler Dennett
critical - characterized by careful evaluation and judgment; "a critical reading"; "a critical dissertation"; "a critical analysis of Melville's writings"

judicial

adjective legal, official, judiciary, juridical an independent judicial inquiry
Translations
قَضائي
soudní
retslig
bíróibírósági
dómara-, laga-
teisėjųteisministeismo keliu
tiesas-
adlîhukukî

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃəl] ADJ
1. [decision, proceedings] → judicial; [separation] → legal
judicial inquiryinvestigación f judicial
2. [mind, faculty] → crítico

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃəl] adj [procedure, process] → judiciairejudicial inquiry nenquête f judiciaire

judicial

adj
(Jur) inquiry, reviewgerichtlich; powerrichterlich; judicial functionRichteramt nt; to take judicial proceedings against somebodyein Gerichtsverfahren ntgegen jdn anstrengen or einleiten; judicial systemJustizsystem nt
(= critical) mindklar urteilend attr, → kritisch

judicial

[dʒuːˈdɪʃl] adj
a. (enquiry, decision) → giudiziario/a
to bring judicial proceedings against sb → procedere per vie legali contro qn
b. (mind, faculty) → critico/a

judicial

(dʒuˈdiʃəl) adjective
of a judge or court of law. judicial powers; He might bring judicial proceedings against you.
juˈdicially adverb
References in classic literature ?
The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court, and in such inferior Courts as the Congress may from time to time ordain and establish.
The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction;--to Controversies to which the United States shall be a Party;--to Controversies between two or more States;--between a State and Citizens of another State;--between Citizens of different States; --between Citizens of the same State claiming Lands under Grants of different States, and between a State, or the Citizens thereof, and foreign States, Citizens or Subjects.
Under this head might be included the particular restraints imposed on the authority of the States, and certain powers of the judicial department; but the former are reserved for a distinct class, and the latter will be particularly examined when we arrive at the structure and organization of the government.
Many of these gentlemen, from despair, perhaps, of ever rising to the bench in Westminster-hall, have placed themselves on the benches at the playhouse, where they have exerted their judicial capacity, and have given judgment,
It enumerated the actors in the Judicial Drama--the men who held in their hands my husband's honor and my husband's life.
I have been received as reader and companion by a lady who is the wife of one of our high judicial functionaries in this part of the world.
Temple had, according to the custom of the new settlements, been selected to fill its highest judicial station.
Solon seems not to have altered the established form of government, either with respect to the senate or the mode of electing their magistrates; but to have raised the people to great consideration in the state by allotting the supreme judicial department to them; and for this some persons blame him, as having done what would soon overturn that balance of power he intended to establish; for by trying all causes whatsoever before the people, who were chosen by lot to determine them, it was necessary to flatter a tyrannical populace who had got this power; which contributed to bring the government to that pure democracy it now is.
They were ugly words; in the ears of an innocent man, perhaps all the uglier; for if some judicial error were in act against him, who should set a limit to its grossness or to how far it might be pushed?
A person who combines the judicial functions of Minos,
It merits particular attention in this place, that the laws of the Confederacy, as to the ENUMERATED and LEGITIMATE objects of its jurisdiction, will become the SUPREME LAW of the land; to the observance of which all officers, legislative, executive, and judicial, in each State, will be bound by the sanctity of an oath.
Hence, it will result that the administration, the political counsels, and the judicial decisions of the national government will be more wise, systematical, and judicious than those of individual States, and consequently more satisfactory with respect to other nations, as well as more SAFE with respect to us.