juggler


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juggler

one who keeps several objects, such as balls or chainsaws, in continuous motion in the air by tossing and catching; one who uses trickery or deception
Not to be confused with:
jugular – related to or situated in the region of the neck or throat; a vital and vulnerable trait, feature, or element that one attacks in an attempt to overcome an adversary swiftly and completely: go for the jugular

jug·gler

 (jŭg′lər)
n.
1. One that juggles objects or performs other tricks of manual dexterity.
2. One that uses tricks, deception, or fraud.

juggler

(ˈdʒʌɡlə)
n
1. (Theatre) a person who juggles, esp a professional entertainer
2. a person who fraudulently manipulates facts or figures

jug•gler

(ˈdʒʌg lər)

n.
1. a person who performs juggling feats, as with balls or knives.
2. a person who deceives by trickery; trickster.
[before 1100; Middle English jogelour, jugelour < Anglo-French, Old French jogleor, jougleor (compare jongleur) « Latin joculātor jester =joculā(rī) + -tor -tor]
jug′gler•y, n.
juggle, juggler - Juggle is from Latin joculus, a diminutive of jocus, and a juggler was originally a jester.
See also related terms for jest.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juggler - a performer who juggles objects and performs tricks of manual dexterityjuggler - a performer who juggles objects and performs tricks of manual dexterity
performer, performing artist - an entertainer who performs a dramatic or musical work for an audience
Translations
قاذِف الكُرات، لاعِب الخِفّهمُشَعْوِذٌ
žongléržongléř
jonglør
jonglööri
žongler
zsonglõrzsonglőr
手品師
마술사
žonglér
žongler
jonglör
นักเล่นกล
nghệ sĩ tung hứng

juggler

[ˈdʒʌgləʳ] Nmalabarista mf

juggler

[ˈdʒʌglər] njongleur/euse

juggler

n
(lit)Jongleur(in) m(f)
(fig: = trickster) → Schwindler(in) m(f); juggler with wordsWortverdreher(in) m(f)

juggler

[ˈdʒʌgləʳ] ngiocoliere m

juggle

(ˈdʒagl) verb
to keep throwing in the air and catching a number of objects (eg balls or clubs). He entertained the audience by juggling with four balls and four plates at once.
ˈjuggler noun

juggler

مُشَعْوِذٌ žongléř jonglør Jongleur ζογκλέρ malabarista jonglööri jongleur žongler giocoliere 手品師 마술사 jongleur sjonglør kuglarz malabarista жонглер jonglör นักเล่นกล hokkabaz nghệ sĩ tung hứng 变戏法者
References in classic literature ?
When they came to a stop only one fat rabbit juggler was seen, the others seeming to be inside him.
The humblest wayside juggler in India could mystify them to the verge of lunacy."
The moral was, as I thought: First, that the chief juggler had heard Mr.
He minds you somewhat of a juggler, balancing a long staff on his chin.
And indeed I was now inclining to the belief that he must be no Circle at all, but some extremely clever juggler; or else that the old wives' tales were true, and that after all there were such people as Enchanters and Magicians.
His progress through the room resembled in almost equal proportions the finish of a Marathon race, the star-act of a professional juggler, and a monologue by an Earl's Court side-showman.
He gave the struggle his attention, as an idler might observe the feat of a juggler, without interest in the outcome.
Give the man who is not made To his trade Swords to fling and catch again, Coins to ring and snatch again, Men to harm and cure again, Snakes to charm and lure again - He'll be hurt by his own blade, By his serpents disobeyed, By his clumsiness bewrayed,' By the people mocked to scorn - So 'tis not with juggler born!
A quarter of an hour later he stopped before a large cabin, adorned with several clusters of streamers, the exterior walls of which were designed to represent, in violent colours and without perspective, a company of jugglers.
All the oarsmen are involved in its perilous contortions; so that to the timid eye of the landsman, they seem as Indian jugglers, with the deadliest snakes sportively festooning their limbs.
Touching your question, we may tell you that we are strollers and jugglers, who, having performed with much applause at Winchester fair, are now on our way to the great Michaelmas market at Ringwood.
Here are such numbers, I will not say of arrant thieves, but of errant knights and errant squires, errant monks and errant minstrels, errant jugglers and errant jesters, that a man with a single merk would be in danger, much more a poor swineherd with a whole bagful of zecchins.