juglet

juglet

(ˈdʒʌɡlət)
n
(Archaeology) a small jug
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Initial analysis by scientists at the British Museum showed that the juglet residue was mostly composed of a plant oil but hinted at the presence of opium alkaloids.
My first summer I was more interested in finding little treasures, long forgotten by their owners: a juglet tucked away in a wall, forgotten and plastered over with new mud, or a coin lost in a Persian villa.
The released discoveries included fragments of bowl rims, bases and body shards, the base of a juglet used for the ladling of oil, the handle of a small juglet and the rim of a storage jar.
Eshel, "A Juglet with a Phoenician Inscription from a Recent Excavation in Jaffa, Israel," Transeuphratene 12 (1996): 59-63 (reading KD HRMS); from Har Mispe Yamim: R.
Among the Iron II materials, Bloch-Smith lists: "bowls, store-jars with dipper juglets, plates/platters, cooking pots, wine decanters and amphoras." The remains of food are not as abundant as the number of related items (pots, bowls, jars, etc.) that have been excavated in mortuary sites (Bloch-Smith, ibid., 108).
The more highly decorated juglets and bowls of Red Polished ware were also made of different clays.
This was probably achieved by careful placement of the vessels during firing, restricting the flow of oxygen to the interior and upper exterior of the bowls and the upper parts of the juglets and flasks.
juglets) are witness to the strict Mosaic laws regarding cleanliness.
There were a few tiny colourful juglets measuring about an inch and a half, the kind little girls could play with at imaginary tea parties.
Recently, many items used for dining including: drinking cups, bowls, juglets, lagynoi and plates in Eastern sigillata A, Cypriot Sigillata, and local Pink Powdery Ware.