juju

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ju·ju 1

 (jo͞o′jo͞o)
n.
1. An object used as a fetish, a charm, or an amulet in West Africa.
2. The supernatural power ascribed to such an object.

[Of West African origin; akin to the source of Hausa jūjū, fetish, evil spirit.]

ju′ju·ism n.

ju·ju 2

 (jo͞o′jo͞o)
n.
A style of Nigerian popular music featuring electric guitars and traditional drums.

[Yoruba jùjú.]

juju

(ˈdʒuːdʒuː)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) an object superstitiously revered by certain W African peoples and used as a charm or fetish
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the power associated with a juju
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a taboo effected by a juju
4. any process in which a mystery is exploited to confuse people
[C19: probably from Hausa djudju evil spirit, fetish]
ˈjujuism n
ˈjujuist n

ju•ju

(ˈdʒu dʒu)

n., pl. -jus.
1. a fetish or amulet used by some West African peoples.
2. the magical power attributed to such an object.
3. a ban or interdiction effected by it.
4. a style of Nigerian popular music using electric guitars, traditional drums, and call-and-response singing.
[1890–95]

juju

1. A Nigerian musical style with roots in the traditional drumbased music of the Yoruba people.
2. An object used in Africa as a charm, fetish, or amulet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.juju - the power associated with a juju
magic, thaumaturgy - any art that invokes supernatural powers
2.juju - a charm superstitiously believed to embody magical powersjuju - a charm superstitiously believed to embody magical powers
good luck charm, charm - something believed to bring good luck

juju

noun
A small object worn or kept for its supposed magical power:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
If spirituality can be defined as a process in which a person looks for something greater than the world they live in to guide their important decisions and to trust when in need of support (Senreich, 2013), Nigerian women's beliefs in the juju can be considered spiritual.
She continues by discussing how the juju interferes with their commitment to therapy and how it can be life-threatening in their case and what efforts have been made to fight sex slavery through the juju.
Unsupported in their homeland, they usually decide to return to the sex trade not for financial reasons but out of profound fear of death or illness bestowed upon them by a manipulation of their beliefs in the juju by their traffickers (National Agency, 2017).