jumbie


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jumbie

or

jumby

n, pl -bies
a ghost
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm playing Bob Marley's Three Little Birds on a Jumbie Jam steel drum.
They all know that her mother was a Jumbie. To prove her innocence and save the children, Corrine contacts Mama D'Leau, queen of the ocean Jumbies, and asks for help to find them.
For example, in the entry of "African Aesthetics in Motion: The Probability of a Third Jumbie Aesthetic in Antigua and Barbuda" (vol.31, no.1, Spring 2007) by Mali Adelaja Olatunje that works to identify the three major aspects (storytelling, playacting and woodism) of the Jumbie Aesthetic of Antigua, and attempt to briefly at some historic moments in African art from pre-colonial to contemporary times to get some understanding of its significance in the affairs of human activities, and see if indeed there is spirituality in the Antiguan creole aesthetic.
Tuk folk characters such as the Tiltman (Mocko Jumbie), Shaggy Bear, and Mother Sally used to be disguised (the latter through gender reversal), invoking the spiritual element and providing a link to the African ritual past.
This custom became rooted in the now global carnival phenomenon, including Trinidad, where Moko Jumbie stilt-walkers precariously parade the streets, particularly enthralling children.
In the latter it is the memories of listening to 'Jumbie' (ghost) stories which inspires the poem.
Albury, and it shows them with a branch of jumbie bean (Leucaena leucocephala).
--, 2012, Pan Jumbie. Memoire sociale et musicale dans les steelbands (Trinidad et Tobago).
El Guaje tiene otros nombres comunes: kao haile (Hawai), leucaena (Australia), ipil-ipil (Filipinas), lead tree (Caribe), tan-tan (Islas virgenes), jumbie bean (Bahamas), acacia bella rosa (Colombia), aroma blanca (Cuba), hediondilla (Puerto Rico), wild tamarind (Antillas Britanicas), y guaje, huaje, huaxin, guaxi, hoaxin, huassi, oaxin, guacis, uaxi, hoatzin en Mexico (Reyes, 2006).
Jumbie in the Jukebox is their latest album, titled in reference to the boogie-man-like "jumbie" spirit of Trinidadian folklore.
Four samples were collected on Saint John: one foliose lichen from a tree and one moss from a stone at Annaberg Plantation (18[degrees]21'33"N, 63[degrees]44'08"W; 10 m elevation), one moss from a rock alongside Pastory Road (18[degrees]19'55"N, 63[degrees]47'13"W; 77 m elevation), and one moss from rock alongside Jumbie Beach Trail (18[degrees]21'05"N, 63[degrees]46'25"W; 6 m elevation).
In 1956 my parents vacationed in Jamaica and brought back maracas and a delightful 78: "Back to back, belly to belly/ I don't care a damn, I done dead aready/ Back to back, belly to belly/ It's a jumbie jamboree ..." The artist listed was The Charmer, backed by Johnny McCleverty and the Calypso Boys.