junco

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jun·co

 (jŭng′kō)
n. pl. jun·cos or jun·coes
Any of various sparrows of the genus Junco of North and Central America, having predominantly gray plumage, a gray or black head, and white outer tail feathers.

[Ultimately (either via Early Modern English junco, the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus, which inhabits marshes and reedbeds), or obsolete Spanish junco ave, a bird of the West Indies with a very long and narrow tail) from Spanish junco, rush (plant of the genus Juncus), from Old Spanish, from Latin iuncus; see jonquil.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

junco

(ˈdʒʌŋkəʊ)
n, pl -cos or -coes
(Animals) any North American bunting of the genus Junco, having a greyish plumage with white outer tail feathers
[C18: from Spanish: a rush, a marsh bird, from Latin juncus rush]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jun•co

(ˈdʒʌŋ koʊ)

n., pl. -cos.
any of several small, gray or gray and brown North American finches of the genus Junco, esp. J. hyemalis, a common winter resident of the U.S. Also called snowbird.
[1700–10; < Sp: rush, bird found in rush beds < Latin juncus rush]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.junco - small North American finch seen chiefly in winterjunco - small North American finch seen chiefly in winter
finch - any of numerous small songbirds with short stout bills adapted for crushing seeds
genus Junco - American finches
dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis, slate-colored junco - common North American junco having grey plumage and eyes with dark brown irises
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
None other than Juncos Racing, the tiny team founded by Argentina-born Ricardo Juncos and to this day run on such a shoestring budget that it was still signing up sponsors on Wednesday.
On 7 July 2018 at 11:48 MDT, while walking in the Rattlesnake Creek drainage near the north end of Missoula, Missoula County, Montana, my attention was drawn to a pair of Dark-eyed Juncos (Junco hyemalis) about 20 m distant emitting a series of "tik" calls (Hostetter 1961; Nolan and others 2002) as they fluttered and perched low to the ground; they were accompanied by a pair of Chipping Sparrows (Spizella passerina), which also were vocalizing and acting agitated, but the sparrows did not fly to the ground with the juncos.
As for juncos specifically, these migratory birds can fly 200 or more miles a night, making them highly capable of spreading bacteria over large swaths of land.
Thornburg previously worked for 16 years at Amgen in a variety of senior level positions, including executive director, Quality Site Head at its Colorado facility as well as executive director, Quality Control, for its manufacturing site in Juncos, Puerto Rico.
I hope they can work with me again sometime." Of course it was no mere serendipity that won the Juncos the Wolf tour.
Martinez-Agosto was born in Juncos, Puerto Rico, a son of Manuel and Rose (Agosto) Martinez.
Amgen is leading the race to get to market the first in a new group of cardio drugs that drastically reduces bad cholesterol, and plans to make evolucumab (formerly AMG 145) at its Juncos plant, reports Caribbean Business (June 5, 2014).
Studying dark-eyed juncos, Whittaker's team compared which were more effective - chemical signals or size and attractive plumage.
the many cunning birds that kill Nestlings, sparrows, juncos for
Inc., a Clondalkin Group Company, has acquired Lehigh Press, located in Juncos, Puerto Rico.